How to Keep Your Mazda Healthy

How to Keep Your Mazda Healthy…

CorkSport Mazda

As a car enthusiast, I always want to make sure that my car maintenance is up to date. In general Mazda’s are very reliable but, whether modified or stock, the life of your car depends on maintenance. Taking good care of your car today can help you avoid paying out more in the future on repairs. Here are the top tips I’ve collected over the years and have applied to keep my Mazda in tip-top shape. Hopefully they’re as helpful to you as they’ve been to me.

Gasoline – Find What Works for You

To find out what octane your engine needs, first check your owner’s manual. The recommended level is often 87octane. Some models have high compression engines which are designed to utilize the octane levels of 89, 91 or higher. Ordinarily, your vehicle will not benefit from using a higher octane than is recommended in the owner’s manual. If your engine knocks or pings at the recommended octane level though, you may need a higher octane gasoline.

Improve gas mileage with the Mazda 3 Short Ram Intake

Knocking may occur under certain conditions. A small percentage of vehicles may knock because of variations in engines of the same model due to manufacturing tolerances, or because of an unusual build-up of engine deposits. Other factors such as extremely hot weather, changes in altitude or hard driving conditions may also cause knocking.

Are you planning on running alternative fuel for your modified car? More often than not gas alternatives for modified vehicles require tuning. Every owner/tuner has its preference but keep the following in mind when choosing between E85 or race gas:

·         E85 will generate significantly more power than your typical recommended octane gas, given the same amount of fuel. The burn rate with E85 is faster than standard 87 to 95 octane, plus you get lower temperatures and more power. The downside is that you will get worse fuel economy, and your Fuel Pump will need more regular cleaning.

·         The best thing about any race fuel is its consistency. You can count on the performance of the fuel and then tune accordingly. It makes things like elevation changes, ambient temps, etc, easier to incorporate into different maps.

Oil – Change it Religiously

Change the oil in your Mazda every 3,000 – 5,000 miles depending on the type of (regular, synthetic) oil you use. If most of your miles come from highway driving (driving at a set speed for long intervals of time), you may be able to change the oil every 5,000 miles, but if you do most of you’re driving in a city or suburban area, check your oil every 2,500 miles just to be safe. If the oil appears completely black, this is a sign that you need to have your oil changed.

If you change the oil yourself, remember to change the oil filter as well. If you take the car to a mechanic to have the oil changed, he should change the filter when he changes the oil. I always recommend the OEM oil Filter and Full Synthetic oil of your preference.

Tire Maintenance – Keep ‘em Rotated

Rotate your tires every 10,000 miles to prevent uneven wear (this means the back tires should be moved to the front wheels and vice versa). Also keep a very close eye on your tire pressure. Mazdas use tires with a very soft tread, which means your car grips the road better, but its tires are more prone to leaks and breakage.

 Look in your manual to see what the tire pressure of your front and back tires should be, and check all four tires’ pressure once a month to make sure no leaks have appeared.

Air Filter – It May be Cleaner than You Think

Mechanics will often try to convince you to change your air filter every time you change your oil. However, you shouldn’t have to change your air filter more than once every 20,000 miles unless it’s excessively dirty.

To learn about high performance air filter’s go to:

·         The Best Power Mod for a Mazda –  //corksport.com/blog/the-best-power-mod-for-a-mazda/

·         High Flow Panel Filter –  //corksport.com/blog/product-release-corksport-high-flow-panel-filter/

Transmission Fluid – Keep an Eye Out

To protect your transmission and keep your car running for as long as possible, have the transmission fluid checked every 40,000 miles. In general, you don’t need to replace it until you hit 100,000 miles, but if you don’t check it and the fluid does burn out, it can ruin your transmission, a job that can cost more than $1,500 to repair on a Mazda.

To learn about a related transmission topic go to Transmission Inserts at: //corksport.com/blog/the-best-power-mod-for-a-mazda/

Battery – Inspect it When the Time is Right

As long as you are careful not to leave the light or any other battery-operated extras such as the stereo turned on when your engine is not running, your Mazda’s battery should last approximately three to four years. When approaching the five- to six-year mark, be sure to have it inspected. It is better to be prepared than to have your battery die unexpectedly when you need to be somewhere.

To learn about the ECU Relocation Battery Box, go to: //corksport.com/blog/increase-room-in-your-engine-bay-with-a-new-battery-box/

 

What If?

 

As a longtime Mazda enthusiast, I’ve seen the company evolve in many innovative ways. Most recently, Mazda has focused their attention on improving the current Skyactive Technology lineup, including the SKY-G 2.0-liter gas and SKY-D 2.2-liter diesel engines.

This technology is great for those looking for good fuel economy and better engine output. But what about the enthusiast who, instead of seeking MPG, is drawn to a fun, high performance vehicle they can enjoy driving 24/7?

 

Here’s what I’m thinking.

Sure, the 2.3 MZR engine had its ups and downs and can be improved by the enthusiasts who own them. But, I imagine something beyond what we have now. Consider this. What if the next lineup of Mazdaspeed 3’s had a 2.5L MZR engine with an upgraded turbo and a High Performance Fuel Pump (HPFP) to help with the volume and pressure to produce an ideal 320 HP beast that will scare your competition away?

But let’s not stop there. Let’s address the torque steer under acceleration with an all-wheel-drive (AWD) system. An AWD Mazdaspeed3 was shelved years ago; the automaker said the high price point wouldn’t be saleable and the hatchback style wouldn’t be attractive to consumers. But now, hatchbacks are growing in popularity and perfectly positioned to rival any competitor. This creates a great opportunity for Mazda to introduce this next generation vehicle. With that in mind, I ask that today we raise our fists in solidarity for this type of Mazdaspeed innovation.

Mazda. “It Just Feels Right”

 

Jose Rivera – Mazda Community Blog

Check out the latest Mazdaspeed 3 performance parts

 

Summary
How to Keep Your Mazda Healthy
Article Name
How to Keep Your Mazda Healthy
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What steps should I take to keep my Mazda or Mazdaspeed running for a long time? What is the recommended maintenance for a Mazdaspeed 3?. As a car enthusiast, I always want to make sure that my car maintenance is up to date. In general Mazda’s are very reliable but, whether modified or stock, the life of your car depends on maintenance. Taking good care of your car today can help you avoid paying out more in the future on repairs. Here are the top tips I’ve collected over the years and have applied to keep my Mazda in tip-top shape. Hopefully they’re as helpful to you as they’ve been to me.
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CorkSport
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13 Replies to “How to Keep Your Mazda Healthy”

  1. “Change the oil in your Mazda every 3,000 – 5,000 miles depending on the type of (regular, synthetic) oil you use.”

    There is absolutely no reason to be changing your oil this often with modern oils, and especially with full-syn unless you are running a dedicated track car. Color is also no indication of oil health either. Multiple oil analyses of Miatas, Mazda3s, and Mazda2s show plenty of life left in the oil after 10k, and even past 15k in some cases using high quality oils like Mobil 1. 5,000 should be a minimum even with dino oil. Mazda is recommending 7,500 on their newer engines running full-syn, so unless you’re under warranty running short OCIs is nothing more than a waste of money and resources.

  2. Honestly, I wish they made a Speed3 Sedan. I dislike the hatches. I would definitely be down for the 2.5 engine turbo. I have the 2.5 sedan and wouldn’t mind an increase in power, but at the same time, this is what works for me right at this moment. (I’m not rich)

    Good read 🙂

  3. Mazda needs to get off their hands and get going on the Gen 3 Mazdaspeed 3. Every car company has one or more high performance vehicles. At present, Mazda has no ‘Zoom,Zoom’ in the lineup. Where is that ‘Halo’ car? Whether it is high performance 2.2 SkyActiv Diesel or a 2.0 L SkyActiv with twin scroll turbo, MAZDA JUST DO SOMETHING! And hell, GO AWD while you are at it. Enthusiats will come,just build it ,damn it!

  4. I’ve been looking forward to the next Generation speed 3. I can’t wait to see what comes out next. It would be amazing to see a hatch back made with that type of potential. Just recently purchased a 2014 Mazda 6 for my fiancé and love everything about the car. So I’m hoping to keep Mazda in the family with the next Gen mazdaspeed 3

  5. The E85 power comment is incorrect. The btus from the equivalent amount of E85 is less than gasoline. A gallon of gasoline has anywhere between 112k and 116k, where as straight ethonal only comes in at 76k btu. To get the same power, you need ~20% E85 fuel.

    The real benefit comes from the increase in octane raating and auto ignition temps. It allows for additional compression and/or boost, but at a cost. E85 isn’t a magical solution, but it has some benefits.

  6. They had it right at the mazdaspeed 6. In which i own and have no problems with whatsoever. Im thinking of switching over to E85 though for the cleaner fuel and performance boost. Could I just switch it over at my next empty tank?

  7. I was just at my regular oil change, the mechanic told me I need to change my transmission fluid, however Im only at 58000km on a 2014 mazda 3 sport…is it necessary or just a money grab…is the colour of the fluid indicative of a problem…

    Thanks for the info

  8. 40000 km is a safe change but 60000 km is a must change. It doesn’t cost much compare to transmission failure cost or misuse.

  9. My Mazda 3 2014 has had to be boosted 4 days in a row. At first the service personnel from the dealer says I need to switch off my auto headlight and all the stereo after I am done driving it. Now he says I just need to change the battery at 53000 km in Etobicoke Ontario. Any insights?

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