What’s That Sound? Suspension Troubleshooting

Good day, Mazda enthusiasts everywhere. Vincent here. In this tech blog, I want to share some tips with you guys and gals on how to diagnose suspension noise, and how to help pinpoint the source of your suspension problem.

It’s impossible for this blog to be the bible of suspension component noise, nor do I intend for it to be. The design, function, engineering, and workings of suspension could take several books to explain. The intention of this post is to help you ask the right questions and create a more methodical approach to diagnosing suspension noise. Hopefully by the end of this, you will have that much more of an understanding of what might be going on before you take it in for some work.

Continue reading “What’s That Sound? Suspension Troubleshooting”

You Asked, We Answered: Our 2nd CorkSport and Mazda Q&A

Corksport Q&A

In January, we wrote a post answering questions our fans asked. It went over so well we wanted to do it again. Here are the top 7 questions we found on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter:

Question: Would you guys consider making a turbo kit for the SkyActiv engines? What challenges would you face with that engine compared to the MZR engine?Screen Shot 2015-01-21 at 12.34.32 PM

  • Questioner: Michel Balk
  • Answer: There are a few key factors that would prove difficult to overcome when turbocharging a Skyactiv-G engine. First is the extremely high compression ratio of 13-14:1. High compression ratios and boost don’t mix well, and the supporting engine design to run that high of a compression ratio is very sensitive to major engine changes. For example: The exhaust manifold is a very well-engineered 4-2-1 design that is critical to running a high compression ratio on 87 octane fuel without pre-detonation. A typical turbo kit would replace the exhaust manifold which could cause many unknown issues. Second comes down to the overall design of the engine. Mazda has made it very clear they are chasing fuel economy, not white knuckle power. So, looking at that goal from a business standpoint, why would Mazda design the engine to handle 250+hp? That would only cost them more money. The engines are lightweight in every aspect: bearing size, connecting rods, pistons, crank…the list goes on. The SkyActiv-G engines are not built for power. Lastly, what good is a turbo kit if you can’t tune it correctly? As of right now there is not an effective method to tune the SkyActiv-powered vehicle. It’s unfortunate, but a turbo SkyActiv-G is a long shot.

Question: Give us all the info about the new CS turbo in production!

  • Questioner: Jeromy Williams
  • Answer: Well I can’t go and spill the beans, but I can give you a few tidbits of information. The goal of this turbocharger is not huge power numbers. Actually I would be in shock if anyone could get this to push 400whp with meth. The goal is to provide a turbocharger that cost only slightly more than a new K04 and is 100% bolt on. When I say bolt-on, I don’t mean “bolt-on” like BNR and ATP define it. This turbocharger requires no modifications to your current intake and exhaust systems; and no modifications need to be made to the oil and coolant lines. It’s like swapping in a new K04, but with much more power potential and no blue smoke. This effectively makes the turbocharger cheaper for the customer because none of the supporting sub-systems need to be upgraded or modified. As for some specs: Power is comparable to a BNR S3, and full spool is in the 3000-3200RPM range—depending on vehicle components. The current tune on my car is reaching 21PSI at 3200RPM with the CS EBCS running in bleed setup, and that’s on the prototype turbo without the billet compressor wheel.
Source: Autoblog
Source: Autoblog

Question: Will you be doing more products for Miata?

  • Questioner: Steve Linnehan
  • Answer: We are very excited about the new MX-5 Miata hitting our shores in the near future. The CorkSport sales manager is going to buy one as soon as possible. We plan to produce a respectable lineup of performance products for the new MX-5 Miata. From suspension to power, we will help you put some more pep in the Miata’s step, so stay tuned!


Mazda 3 Exhaust SystemQuestion: What do I need to put more HP on my 2012 Mazda 3 2.0i SkyActiv?

  • Questioner: Brayam Calo
  • Answer: CorkSport has a couple options for your dilemma, Brayam. Combining our SRI, Cold Air Box, and Power Series Catback Exhaust System showed impressive gains for the little 2.0. On our dyno, the stock 2.0 made 118hp/110lbft, but when we added the components above, we saw power increase to 135hp/123lbft. This is a respectable increase in power for a naturally aspirated engine.

Question: What is an approximated max horsepower output that can be produced in an MS3 without upgrading turbo back?

  • Questioner: Christopher DeCaro
  • Answer: This is a difficult question to answer accurately as there are so many factors that play into the maximum power of an engine. The OEM downpipe is extremely restrictive on the MS3 and is commonly recommended as one of the first upgrades. Our dyno testing showed a 50hp increase over stock with only a Stage 2 intake, downpipe and racepipe installed. So as you add more components and eventually go with a larger turbocharger, the loss in power from the OEM downpipe will only increase.

Question: Is there a way to have the engine RPM drop faster while shifting or revving from an idle?

  • Questioner: Matt Zoomin Brown
  • Answer: The rate at which an engine can rev up or down comes down to simple physics: “Force = Mass x Acceleration”. You often hear of people upgrading their flywheel from the OEM steel piece to a lightweight steel or aluminum/steel two-piece flywheel. By reducing the weight of the flywheel and the rest of the rotating mass of the engine, you effectively reduce the amount of energy needed to make the engine rev up. The opposite works for revving down. The greater the mass of the rotating assembly, the more resistance need to stop the rotation—or the longer it takes to spin down. This is a result of the “Moment of Inertia” of the rotating mass.

Question: I would like to turbo my 2010 2.5 N/A Mazda 3, what do I need to know?

  • Questioner: Cynthia Senger
  • Mazdaspeed 3 is the better turbo choiceAnswer: Like everyone else I’m going to recommend you sell your car and buy a car that was turbocharged from the factory, but for the sake of argument and fueling the fire I can point you in the right direction. The 2.5 N/A engine and the 2.3 turbo engine are very similar in design. I would start with buying a blown turbo engine, removing the exterior components, and then modifying them to work on your engine. Now the easy part is done… Next, you will need some way to tune the vehicle because turbocharging an engine that was not designed to be turbocharged is not a simple bolt-on affair. If you get past these two major hurdles, then bravo! Unfortunately, unless you improved the engine internals to handle this power, the engine will probably not live long with the added stress of its newfound power. Back to the first option: Buying a Mazdaspeed 3 makes a lot more sense in many aspects. Reliability, durability, and aftermarket support make big power much easier to achieve. Granted, a Mazdaspeed 3 may be more expensive to buy upfront, but I am almost certain it will be cheaper in the long run and will come with far fewer headaches and days without a car. I wish you the best of luck!

 

Thank you for your questions and keep them coming. We’ll have a Q&A every month for your Mazda performance questions.

#ZoomZoom

Barett Strecker-01

3 Myths About What’s Under the Hood of Your Mazdaspeed 3

3 Myths About What’s Under the Hood of Your Mazdaspeed 3 (Too be Taken Lightly…)

 

So you drive a Speed 3 eh? You probably think you are the shiz-at with your FoMoCo powered wagon…, but don’t worry bro I’m here to set a few myths straight.

Myth #1: “Elevendy” gears.

 

Blog pic #1

First, don’t be fooled by Mr. Diesel; you do not have “elevendy” gears begging to be double-clutched from stop light to stop light.

So give that lefty pedal a break and stick (pun intended) with 1st through 6th…throw a little R&R in there if you must.

Myth #2: The “black hole”.

 

Blog Pic #2

Second, there is not a black hole hiding under your hood sucking all your money away.  You may tell you girlfriend that, but come on seriously?

There’s a hunk of metal under there that you keep attaching more expensive hunks of metal to, but if your “black hole” excuse is working then you got yourself a real keeper… If not… check out financing.

Myth #3: Your “mating call emitter”.

 

Blog pic #3

Lastly, the hunk of metal (I mean black hole) does not have a “mating call emitter” attached to it, I promise.  Red lights are not the green light to shoot for the redline of your hunk of metal and it will not draw the attention of the potential mate, at least not the attention you are seeking.

BUT, if that does happen to attract a potential mate, then you already know the black hole excuse will work flawlessly.

Thats all for now.

Zoom-Zoom

-Barrett@Corksport.com

2014 SCCA National Championship Runoffs: End of a Long Season

2014 SCCA National Championship Runoffs

So, a few weeks back I attended the 2014 SCCA National Championship runoffs at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca with aspirations of finishing on the podium in B-Spec with the CorkSport sponsored Mazda 2.

CorkSport Mazda 2

Day One:

The first day was a practice day in order to check out the car and review the changes we made, ensuring that everything was perfect for the three days of qualifying.  After the first test session, we made a few small changes and went back out for the afternoon session…

That’s where things got crazy.

The track was feeling greasy and the car was sliding around a bit, making corner 6 a handful since its taken flat out in a B-Spec car.  On the 7th lap the car drifted to the outside much faster than it had before so I steered into the drift and went off in the dirt. My plan was to ride it out and get back on the track towards the top of the hill.

Needless to say, things did not go as planned…

 

The video above is courtesy of a Spec Miata driver and friend at the track Steven Powers who (being directly behind me) got front row seats to witness the whole thing.

Rather than riding it out of the dirt, the front corner of the Mazda 2 made direct contact with a concrete wall… sideways (which  data showed being at 30mph). After playing 20 questions with the safety crew and getting the car loaded up, I was dropped off in my pit to evaluate the damage and make a plan on what to do next.  We got the car disassembled with help of fellow racers, slowly realizing just how bent up the car really was.  Besides the sheet metal, we had punched several holes in the engine block, broke a wheel, bent the right side control arm and front sub frame.

It took 2 hours to take the car from a crunched mess to the picture below.

 

The Aftermath

Day Two:

I chose to sleep on the decision to either rebuild or scrap the whole weekend race.  The next morning, with an optimistic attitude, we took inventory and made the choice to rebuild the car at the track. Mazdaspeed Motorsports lent a major hand as we started chasing down the parts we would need to replace, while I was hitting the phones looking for a body shop with an empty frame machine so we could get started on the car ASAP.  8 calls later, we had our shop and loaded the car up on a flatbed in order to get the repairs going for straightening the car and getting it ready for a frame rail and shock tower.

More Aftermath

Spectrum Auto Collision was a great help with the overall repair of the car. They got right on the job and loaded the car up on to the frame machine while their awesome technician started straightening the drives side rail. Arrangements were made to have the replacement frame parts arrive to the shop for the following day so they could continue the repairs non-stop, getting the car back together for Thursday’s qualifying session.

corksport racing

Day Three and Four:

Due to a mishap with UPS, we were out one critical part needed to not only start work that Wednesday morning but also have it completed by that afternoon. This complication pushed back the plan that included having the car assembled in time to post a qualifying time.  After a discussion with the race officials, they agreed to let me start at the back of the B-Spec field allowing me to race despite not having a qualifying time. Which was awesome of them.

That Thursday evening, my trusty friend was delivered right back to the track so that we could start the re-assembly process. With the help of my crew, we rebuilt the engine, reinstalled the whole front suspension and sheet metal, and reinstalled the rebuilt motor within two days.

Day Five:

Saturday evening, we fired up the car to make sure it would be ready to go for the race.  After a drive around the paddock, the car was feeling good and ready to race on Sunday.

RACE DAY:

Lucky for us, the B-Spec/T-4 race was the first event on Sunday, meaning the track would be in its best condition.

Since I was at the back of the field, I snagged an opportunity to pass up the stacked up cars on the inside of corner 2 and get passed 2 cars in the first lap. Several laps later I was able to get around one of the HPD Honda fits, putting me in 8th place. The leading Chevy sonic was brought to a stop due to a check engine light, moving him from 1st place to last place and me to 7th. During the race, the Mazda 2 felt really loose (the back of the car was sliding around) and like the tires were wearing out quickly.  This is not expected due to the brand new tires we just had put on the car for the race. BFGoodrich tires always hold up extremely well to the abuse of B-Spec cars.  I reported it to the crew over the radio and I got back an acknowledgement.

CorkSport Racing Accident

If you look at the picture above you can see smoke rolling out of the front wheel. 

Results:

At the end of the race (back in the pits) I saw the driver’s side of the car was coated in Redline MTL transmission fluid which had also been coating the front and rear wheels causing that loose feeling I was getting.

Imagine driving on and off ice whipping through corners at the fastest speed you can go. That is exactly how crazy the race felt driving with the transmission fluid everywhere.

Later I found out that the crew had actually seen the smoke but decided to keep quiet about it so as not to alarm me and keeping me from changing my driving style (which had already been working). I am incredibly thankful they made that call, because it would have changed my driving and possibly caused more problems.

The final result was 7th place, which doesn’t give any trophies from the SCCA but I got something even better from Mazdaspeed.  I was gifted a copy of the book Never Stop Challenging, which chronicles Mazda’s path to winning Le Mans and overcoming all of the challenges they went through.  I was told by a good friend at the track (who has experience in amateur and professional racing) that he had not seen a car with as much damage as we had, rebuilt and make it back onto the track before.

 

Mazdaspeed race

 

Appreciation:

Thank you so much to CorkSport, Monarch Inspections (for the season long logistics support), Mazda Motorsports Crew, John Doonan, Mike Allen, Scott Kaluza, David Cook, and Dean Case who were at the track for the parts sourcing and tech help and the best trophy a Mazda racer could get.

Big thanks to my Dad (aka the crew), Joey Jordan Motorsports (for the help rebuilding the motor and getting the alignment straight), James Wilson and Black Armor Helmets (for driving out to race his 2 from Texas), Brad Green and his crew (for help getting the car taken apart), Steven Powers (for the video) as well as all of the B-Spec racers who I got to compete against all season long.

Last but not least (in any way), I would like to say thank you to my wife Jessica and two daughters for being understanding of my pursuit in racing.

Zoom zoom.

– Derrick from CorkSport

Derrick_HEadshot

Derrick started working with cars when he was in high school.  A friend had a GLC which they tweaked a bit which then became a 323 then into RX-7s and it was all Mazda down hill from there. His current projects are a 1968 Mustang, The 1988 323 GTX (never ending project), 1986 Honda Shadow Motorcycle and a 1968 Silverline Rambler 16′boat. For motorsports activities he has previously participated in drag racing the CorkSport Protege Drag car and Rally Cross with the 323 GTX. Currently he is driving the CorkSport Mazda 2 B-Spec race car.

 

If you attend any events CorkSport is at Derrick will be the guy you will talk to at most of them, so stop by and say hello!

 

Dear Car Guy – Don’t be a Jerk, Let’s get to Work

Dear Car Guy,

 

Hoping this finds you well and enjoying the late night rides with your “baby”, feeling the power beneath you and in your hands as you find your favorite spot to drive. Nothing like a late night summer drive to clear the mind and invoke positive vibes.

I’ve been well and learning more and more about how to connect with those same positive vibes while working. As you may know, I work in the customer service department. It’s like choosing to work in the missing baggage claim area, or being the person who empties porta-potties, you’re bound to catch some crap and unhappiness each day.

What’s nice about my job is I am the decision maker; there is no “manager” above me. Anyone who has a warranty claim or complaint knows they’re dealing directly with the person who will be making the decisions and coming to a mutually reasonable resolution. It’s more often than not that we do come to a mutually beneficial resolution, because I’ve been given permission to take care of our customers.

Now, in dealing with car companies, I know there are a lot of Car Guy’s that have horrific experiences, where a company has zero desire to take care of them or work through issues, so when they come to me with guns blazing and fists raised, I realize this is just from their past experiences.

I just wanted to take the time to tell you, that we’re a reasonable company and we know we’re not perfect, BUT we’re always willing to help. We’re always willing to work towards a solution, and we’re always going to get back to you.

So when you call, Car Guy, know that if I don’t pick up, you’ll hear from me that day. When you email, know that you’ll get a reply within that same day. When I say I’ll call you back, you will be receiving a call back. When you ask a question, we are always willing to find the answer.

I hope you can understand our side of things a little better now, but just a heads up: As a standard, our company values its employees, and realizes that mental health and emotional well-being are more important than making a few bucks.

For whatever reason, I have experienced some people that just want to spread hate, and ill will. A burned out LED bulb is not worth being yelled at, cursed at, or being a personal punching bag for an angry Car Guy. This would make sense if we were a company that didn’t at least attempt and DESIRE to solve the problems as quickly as possible. We will always try out hardest to take care of those people, because we understand that sometimes it’s just a bad day, or you’ve been put through the ringer by other companies before, but if necessary, I have been giving permission to “fire you”.

What does it mean to be fired as a customer?

Ex: Angry Car Guy calls us and decides to yell, curse and/or throw a tantrum while I am trying to help. I reserve the right to hang up on you and 86 you as a customer. When you threaten us with personal insults and call us amazingly unoriginal names, and I am on the verge of tears, it just isn’t worth it anymore to try and be polite back. We will end the call, and move on with our days. We are here to help, not be the scape goats for your bad day.

Put your fists away, put the guns down, and come at me with a positive mindset, knowing that I’m going to do anything and everything I can to get you taken care of. I’ll be in contact with you consistently to let you know what we need, and what we’re doing. If at any point you have questions, call me up and I’ll let you know what I’m working on.

I am a customer service specialist. Yes, by nature this job isn’t going to be the most amazing all the time. Sometimes we have fallen short as a company and it’s my part to fix it and make your experience a more pleasant one. I am just hoping that, after reading this, you will know that we are here to help, and that we know that we’re not perfect. Give a chance to make it a better experience, refrain from yelling (because honestly it makes me cry sometimes), and know that we’re doing everything we can to get you taken care of as soon as possible.

Until next time, stay fast, stay safe, and stay happy!

–          Kim@CorkSportKim-CorkSport-in-Engine-Bay-Car-Mazda

Dear Car Guy – Tell Me What You Want

Dear Car Guy,

It’s been a while my friend. I hope this finds you well and enjoying the midsummer heat, hot nights, car shows, and scantily clad women that July and August tends to provide.

Over on our end of things, it’s been hot and busy! Keeping up with your requests has kept a smile on my face though. From a simple request for a drawing on the box, to the silly requests like sending livestock, “surprise me”, or simply “make me smile when I open this up”, it’s been a lot of fun and a good break to my day.

It got me thinking though, some of you get surprised without a request, others of you send them in as notes on your order, and still yet others will shoot a quick email saying you’d love to see what we at CorkSport can come up with.

So here I am, writing to you, sharing a few of my past favorite requests:

WOW Wood Burn CorkSport

mazdaspeed-3-drawn-kim-corksport-hand-painting-mazda

signed-by-all-corksport-employees

Though we can’t honor all requests, we certainly try our best!  Whether you want us to build you a sling shot, a lizard drawing on your box, or simply request us to send you the strangest thing we can find in our desk… we love the personal aspect that we get to attach to your orders!

Often our best requests come from the comment field in order notes. Feel free to list notes, jokes, or requests in this box here:

Request

 

So remember to feel free to request some drawings, or silly things, it breaks up the monotony and gives you (and us) a smile! Hope all stays well Car Guy! Until next time, stay fast, stay safe, and stay happy!

 

-K

mazdaspeed-3-corksport-iron-man-super-cool

go-bills-corksport-mazdaspeed

first-product-line-corksport-short-shifter

cat-back-exhast-corksport

bacon-mustache-corksport-love-mazdaspeed

awesome-kim-corksport-drawing-mazdaspeed-3-hand-drawn

Why Every Mazdaspeed Owner Needs the Cobb Accessport

CorkSport-Cobb-Accessport-ECU-Tuner-Mazdaspeed

What is an accessport?

The Cobb Tuning Accessport is a device that communicates with your ECU (Engine Control Unit). When you own an acessport you will be able to read error codes, modify engine settings, and take informational logs of data to keep your Mazda running reliably, and to give it more power.

The main reason people purchase the accessport is to install maps on their car.

What is a map?

A map is a preconfigured group of settings or parameters for your car. Want your Mazdaspeed to get better gas mileage? Run the “Economy Mode Map.” Want your Mazdaspeed to run faster? Remove the boost limits in 1st and 2nd gear, then run a “Stage 1 Map.”

Maps also allow you to tell your ECU specifically what power modifications you have done and how you want them running. If you have a new downpipe that flows better and Max Flow Fuel Pump Internals, then your ECU will need a new map installed that tells it how to control the boost levels by controlling the waste gate, the spark advance, ideal fuel pressure, fuel trims, and many other things.

CorkSport-Cobb-Accessport-Install-Car-AP-Mazdaspeed

So where do I get these maps?

The Cobb Accessport will come pre-installed with a few maps that are known as OTS (Off-The-Shelf) Maps. They are basic maps that should cover a wide variety of parts. Though they are more beneficial than keeping a stock ECU tune, they are nowhere near as beneficial as doing a custom tune. Custom tunes can be done by anyone with Accesstuner Pro who is willing to devote time to learning the ins and outs of engine control management. Most people who don’t want to spend hours tweaking small variables to meet safe and powerful conditions choose to get a tune done by a professional.

For the Mazdaspeed platform there are many tuners to choose from:

How do I use this thing?

The accessport is really rather simple. If you can use a modern smartphone, you can figure out the accessport.

  • Step 1: Find the OBD II port on your Mazdaspeed 3 (located on the left side of the dash above the hood lever, below the traction control switches.) and then plug the accessport cable in.
  • Step 2: Tell it to install. Make sure you follow all directions on the screen and don’t shut your car off halfway through install.

Once installed to your car the accessport will not be able to be installed in any other vehicle unless you uninstall it. This is called by many “marrying “ the accessport. You can only install an “unmarried” accessport to your car. If it’s already “married” it will not work, which is why buying one used can be so sketchy.

Now that it’s installed, you can change maps, do datalogs, and view check engine lights right from inside your car. When it isn’t installed, you can easily connect it to your computer and load the accessport manager to copy new maps to the device, or open datalogs in Excel. You can eve use tools such as Virtual Dyno to monitor performance gains.

CorkSport-Accessport-Manager-ECU-Datalog-MazdaspeedThe Final Step

Once you have installed the accessport and decided on the map to use there is only one thing left to do: Drive. Get out there and enjoy your car with its new power curve, removed boost limits, and better breathing. If you thought your car was fun before, just wait until you get an OTS map installed with your accessport and put the pedal down for the first time!

Once you’ve done that and realize how amazing it is, I dare you to get a custom tune for your specific car, modifications, gas, elevation, and driving habits. You will be BLOWN away.

Overall, the accessport is an amazing device that every Mazdaspeed owner should have for safety, reliability, power, and to learn more about your car. Let us know if you have any questions about them, or purchase one here.

No 32 i Moto Cybernation Mazda Speed 3

The Best Power Mod For A Mazda

In the ongoing quest to make your Mazda more powerful, and fun to drive, we have developed many great aftermarket options.

The stock airbox and air intake on most Mazdas were designed for economy instead of power. The problem with using the stock filter and airbox is that it functions similar to breathing through a rag. The rag does a great job of keeping contaminants and dirt out, but it also requires extra effort to pull air in.

When you upgrade the intake to a CorkSport Short Ram Intake you remove the air stifling setup and finally breath freely. Suddenly, your car goes from an underpowered, oxygen lacking zombie, to the free breathing, throaty roar of increased horsepower and freedom.

Take a look at a section from our book “The Ultimate Mazda Performance Guide” about how a Short Ram intake system should be your first modification for power.

If you are looking to start the year off right, and are ready to upgrade your intake system we can answer any questions on which option is best for your ride.

Want to start 2014 off with some extra power? How about just letting your Mazda breathe easy? Thankfully you can do both with one simple modification, the Short Ram Intake.

www.corksport.com

How to Make Money Selling Mazda Performance Parts

Recently we have spent a lot of time talking about how to get our customers exactly what they want. After all the conversations of how to help customers, involve customers, work with customers, and ultimately, care for them, one coworker asked “well, how do we go out of our way to care for our customers, and make money?” With that question hanging in the air, one of our owners, Rich, decided to share a blog he wrote with all of us. Rich happens to love clean and precise bullet pointed documents, so take a moment to peer into the mind of our fearless leader.

Other than bullet pointed blogs, Rich also really likes FD RX7’s, so let’s start with a photo of one of those. FD-RX7-Cool-Good-Looking

How To Make Money Selling Mazda Parts

This is the question of the day, and after pondering and thinking, we could really only come up with one answer.

Give ‘em what they want. It’s really that simple.

So how do we do it?

We Make Products You Ask For

The vast majority of the products we develop start as an idea sent to us from someone like you. We collect your ideas via THIS PAGE. Periodically, we review every single idea sent to us alongside a few ideas of our own.

How We Choose Which Parts to Make

With a healthy collection of product ideas, we compare each of them against various criteria.

  • How difficult will the part be to develop?
  • How expensive will the part be to develop?
  • How long will it take to develop?
  • How many do we expect to sell?
  • Can we deliver a quality part at a price acceptable to our customers? We call this value.
  • Can we make a profit on this part?

The best idea’s bubble to the top and are quickly added into our development pool. The ideas we are not quite ready to pursue get pushed off for future considerations. Some ideas just don’t fit our business model. When this happens, we let you know.

We Get the Community Involved

We get customers involved during development of most every product we release. We call this customer collaboration and it’s the way we make sure we release the part you want.

The community helps us:

  • Determine the criteria for parts like color, material, and a host of other features.
  • Design the part.
  • Test fit prototypes and pre-production parts. We get great feedback on quality and fitment.
  • Refine installation instructions, packaging, and part presentation.

Our product submission page has a spot to indicate if you’d like to be involved. We’ll do our best to get everyone involved that wants to.

Would you like to know more about how we develop parts? Let us know here on our blog, Facebook, or any other way you like.

“Which intercooler should I get?”

“Which intercooler should I get?” At Corksport we get this question almost every day. The debate of top mount intercooler vs. front mount intercooler has been one that has raged on in the forums for years. Just looking around you will see both options on all sorts of cars. So what is the answer?

Mazdaspeed 3 Top Mount Intercooler

 

The Mazdaspeed 3 and Mazdaspeed 6 both come with top mount intercoolers (TMIC’s) from the factory. There are many reasons for this, but the main one is that it is much cheaper to manufacture and install. A Top Mount Intercooler can be installed directly to the engine at the factory so it is ready to drop into the car which saves both time and money.

Beside the TMIC, the other option available is the front mount intercooler (FMIC). Both styles have their pros and cons. The upsides of the TMIC is that it uses the shortest possible path from the turbo to the engine. This reduces the amount of time it takes for the car to accelerate, this feeling can be amplified between shifts when the power comes back on very quickly. The TMIC also is very simple and compact with very few connections and possible places to leak. A TMIC will also weigh very little compared to a FMIC setup and usually is in a place with very good airflow.

 

CorkSport-Intercooler-Mazda-Mazdaspeed-3-Front-Mount-vs-Top-Mount-2

 

The downside of TMIC’s is that they are generally limited in size by the design of the car and can be much smaller than most FMIC’s. They are typically placed very high in the engine bay, raising the car’s center of gravity. Most importantly though, the biggest downside of the TMIC is that it sits in a hot engine bay. Just by sitting on top of the motor, the TMIC can soak up heat thereby decreasing its effectiveness in cooling the air compressed by your turbo.

 

CorkSport-Intercooler-Mazda-Mazdaspeed-3-Front-Mount-vs-Top-Mount

 

The principals are mostly the same for the pros and cons of the FMIC. The core of a FMIC can be much larger, and in the case of a properly designed system, can cool temperatures much more effectively. Being placed further away from the engine and out into the stream of air can make the FMIC much cooler and more importantly, more consistent. One last reason that many people love FMIC’s is the look, nothing says I mean business more than a massive bar and plate core smiling in your rear view.

The biggest downside of a FMIC is that the install process is much longer. Other downsides of FMIC’s can be the much longer piping needed to route compressed air to them. This piping can increase turbo lag and usually has many couplers that can have the potential to leak or cause other issues.

 

So what does CorkSport say? As a general rule we would say if you don’t plan to add more than 50-100 horsepower, a top mount intercooler will work just fine and be much easier on your plans and wallet. If you eventually want to go wild with your car and build it up much higher than stock, you will probably want to look hard at a front mount intercooler. Our advice would be to try to plan in advance what you want out of the car so that you only have to buy parts once.

Happy spooling!