What it takes to Make 500 Whp In Your Mazdaspeed

400 Whp not enough? 

Searching for more power? 

Are you building your motor, and trying to figure out your next setup? Say no more… 

This next blog is going to focus on making some big power numbers, and what it takes to get there. Now is the time to go beyond the scope of the 400 Whp look at what it takes for 500 Whp. 

As stated in our 400 WHP blog, this is not an all-inclusive guide and the only way to achieve these power levels… However, it’s something that’s been tried and tested for years and proven to be a reliable method of making the power you’re after. We are aiming to educate you in the best way to make the most out of your MZR engine.

Let’s get started 

With the MZR engine being out for over 10 years, it’s had a lot of time under the knife. We know how the engine responds to different airflow mods, tuning characteristics, fuel, etc.

We also know that 400 Whp is about the limit of the stock bottom end on the Mazdaspeed 3. If you have a Mazdaspeed 6, then you can assume it’d be a bit less given you have AWD and need to account for further drivetrain loss.

It is beyond this point that the motor is in danger and could potentially let go. Keep in mind that at 400 Whp you are nearly doubling OEM power output, and that’s a lot of strain on those pistons and rods that were never designed to endure that power long term.  If you are wanting to go beyond 400 Whp then you should know that you are also looking at the price tag of a Built motor.

CorkSport

Now, if you are relatively new to this, and aren’t very familiar with the basic building blocks of the platform such as the Cobb Accessport, and Upgraded Fuel Pump Internals, then I invite you to read our 400 Whp Blog to build a good foundation. Do you feel you have a good understanding of what it takes to get to 400 Whp? Then you are ready to read on!

When you’re at a point in your build that you are seeking 500 Whp then it’s safe to say that you probably have gotten the more tedious stuff out of the way… You probably have about every bolt-on modification, and you understand what it’s like to work with a professional tuner.

That being said, let’s do a bit of a recap on the 400 Whp mods, so you have a good idea of where we need to go from here.

These are all the recommended/required mods to increase engine airflow and efficiency to make 400 WHP.

Basic Bolt Ons: (Less Expensive / easily removable parts )
Fuel Pump Internals
3.5” Intake (Requires ECU relocation or battery box)
Upgraded EBCS
Upgraded Map Sensor
Upgraded Downpipe
Upgraded Intercooler
Upgraded Catback Exhaust
Oil Catch Can

Advanced Bolt Ons: ( More expensive / more difficult to remove )
Upgraded Turbocharger
Upgraded Intake Manifold (Optional but Recommended)
Upgraded Exhaust Manifold (Optional but Recommended)

Fuel:

Stock Fueling on Pump Gas usually nets around 330-350 Whp depending on octane and gas quality.

Stock Fueling on E85 blend fuel usually nets around 370-390 Whp depending on Tune aggression and also Quality of the gas and E85.

With Aux fueling such as port fuel, or methanol you can easily bump up over the 400 Whp mark and beyond. (I’ll get into the differences more in a bit)

Putting down 500 Whp pretty much requires many of the same mods that 400 Whp does, BUT the primary game changers are the Advanced Bolt On’s and Fuel.

(If you’d like to refresh your memory on the basic bolt-ons and how they affect your Mazda please refer to the 400 Whp blog.)

I’m ready for more POWAHH

In the grand scheme of things, making the 400whp is relatively easy and affordable considering it can be done on the stock block. With bolt on parts, fuel, and a tune you can easily hit that number. But as soon as you want to make more, you’re looking at a built engine, as previously mentioned, And that’s a whole new can of worms.

So, what’s all involved in a built motor? That’s a bit of an open-ended question as there are so many variables to take into consideration. However, “built” engines usually contain forged pistons and rods with upgraded bearings to handle more abuse. From there, the complexity increases as you get into port work, cams, etc. I will touch on that a bit more later. 

Fortunately for you, most engine builders have their entry level engine ready to handle 500 wheel horsepower and it’s a pretty basic build that features stronger internals. But, the tedious stuff like port work is usually reserved for the higher tier engines that are usually built for more power.

I won’t get into the engine building side of things, as that could turn into a whole other tangent. But you can assume that a built motor may cost you anywhere from 5k and up dependent on the level of motor you go with. From there we can start piecing together our 500 Whp build.

CorkSport

Let’s Talk TURBO’S (Crowd Cheers) 

The turbo is the heart and soul of the Zoom-Zoom, so it seems like a suitable place to start.

CST5 Turbo Upgrade – 2006-2013 DISI MZR

As we know, the CST4 is happy up to around 400+ Whp. Which is why it was the recommended turbo in the 400whp blog. But now we are ready to take a step up to the CST5 which is happy up to… You guessed it! 500+ Whp. With the ability to hit 20 PSI by 3500-3600 RPM and Carry out 30 PSI it really packs a punch for its size. You may be needing to upgrade your intake to pair to the T5, I’d recommend our Power Series 3.5” Intake I mentioned earlier. It will come with the 4” coupler required to mate up to the turbo.

The turbo is available with an internal gate, or an External Gate so you can choose what works best for you. Both options can hit the same power numbers.

Let’s Talk Fuel

HPFP System

“What options do I have for bigger injectors?”

At CorkSport I get this question rather often. Unfortunately, I must tell them “There aren’t any”

Without going too off topic here I will explain why.

Our cars feature a Direct Injection fuel system or DI… And by today’s standards, it’s a bit primitive. The MZR DISI was one of the first pioneers of modern DI, which is probably why the OEM high-pressure fuel pump can’t even sustain the full potential of the factory injectors. Don’t worry, the CorkSport Fuel Pump internals fixes that problem.

Port Injection is simple and easy to maintain. It works by spraying low pressure fuel into the intake runner where it atomizes in the air stream before entering the combustion chamber.  For car guys, it’s fantastic and easy to swap out injectors when you are ready for more fuel.

Direct Injection takes a whole new approach. Instead of the fuel going in through the intake manifold, it goes DIRECTLY into the combustion chamber.

In order to overcome the force of compression, the fuel must be highly pressurized in order to atomize correctly. It also must deliver more volume in a shorter amount of time. This is why your Mazdaspeed has a high-pressure fuel pump. 

This causes a whole lot of complications for injector developers because things like fuel pressure also become a huge variable when attempting to create a larger Direct Injector. The bigger the hole on the injector, the more fuel pressure required to create adequate atomization. Combining that with the rarity, and size of the Mazdaspeed platform, it’s just not worth it for any manufacturer to develop one.

So, what’s the solution to getting more fuel? Well… As previously mentioned, you pretty much have 2 choices Port Injection, or Methanol. Since both of these are considered Auxiliary fueling, they are controlled by separate controllers, unless you want to ball out and get a Motec ECU that can control the OEM engine systems, as well as your port fuel.

Choosing which system, you want to go with solely depends on your power goals, and how much money you have to spend. Those 2 factors are pretty much the only question you need to ask yourself.

Leo dropping that cash on a port Injection fuel system

Methanol – Cheap and simple 

Port Injection – Expensive and Reliable 

You must remember that the OEM fuel system, even with E85 in your tank is only good up to around 370-390 whp. So, everything beyond that is supported by your AUX fueling. If your extra fuel system stops spraying for any reason, that could lead to catastrophic damage depending on how much you’re relying on it. When you’re just trying to nudge over the 400 whp mark on a CST4 or CST5 then Methanol is usually fine in my opinion. But beyond that, I’d be concerned with the reliability aspect.

When you have a properly set up port fuel kit (Manifold with fuel rail required) it behaves almost as if there is no AUX fueling system. This is especially the case when you have it all integrated into your factory gas tank and don’t need to fill up a separate cell. A quality Port Fuel Kit is pretty full-proof.

You’ll have to make the decision that’s best for you, but I’d recommend a port fuel kit to support 500 Whp, vs a heavy spraying methanol kit.

CorkSport Manifold With Fuel Rail For Port Injection

Let’s Talk Manifolds 

Manifolds are responsible for transferring all the air in and out of the motor from their respective cylinder. This job is an important one as it needs to distribute the gases as evenly as possible. The more even the flow, the better the performance!

On the Mazdaspeed Platform, the OEM intake manifold is known to be the bigger restriction over its exhaust counterpart. With very unequal flow distribution across the 4 runners, it has been proven not only to restrict power but also cause premature wear and tear on cylinder #3; here’s why.

This is caused by “over-feeding” air to #3 in comparison to the other cylinders. Over time this #3 is actively running leaner than its counterparts which is why it’s been deemed the most common cylinder to blow if an engine does give way.

CorkSport Intake Manifold shown to provide example of even Flow

It is because of this, that I always recommend a CorkSport intake manifold for even stock power levels. It may not be required to make 500 Whp, since you can essentially just turn up the boost to counteract the restriction. But in the name of reliability and efficiency, you should always try to help your engine breathe with the most minimal effort while also helping it maintain its health. 

CS manifolds, FMIC, and 3.5” intake in picture

The OEM Exhaust manifold may not be as bad as the intake manifold, but it’s still not ideal, especially at this power level. A performance exhaust manifold needs to be designed with exhaust scavenging in mind. 

Exhaust scavenging is a very cool effect. The exhaust gases leaving the combustion chamber travel out the individual runners and enter the collector. It’s at this point where it creates a vacuum-like effect on the runners, assisting the exhaust gases to escape from the other cylinders. This constant scavenging helps improve exhaust flow dramatically, especially when you start making power over 400 Whp.

You can learn more about exhaust Scavenging in our Blog that dives deep into it and shows examples comparing our Exhaust Manifold to OEM!

CS Exhaust Manifold vs The OEM Manifold

When you replace both the Intake and Exhaust Manifolds with a performance unit you are drastically helping your motor improve its efficiency, which can mean 3 things.

1. Make the same power on less boost.
2. Make more power on the same boost.
3. Make Way more power on way more boost. 

When you have to push your car less to make the power you want, reliability improves, and it also needs more room on the table for when you want to make even more power later on.  That leads us to our next topic, Efficiency Mods.

The Cherry’s On Top 

With a built motor, full bolt ons, fuel, and a big enough turbo you can easily hit 500 whp.

However, efficiency mods such as Camshafts or Throttle Body will help you make more power easier, or really push the limits your turbo by improving its ability to perform.

Our CS Camshafts are ideal when you start getting into this power range. It helps with everything from turbo spool, midrange power, and top end. Even on K04 powered speed 3’s / 6’s our cams netted around 20 Whp. You can imagine the kind of exponential improvements it can make as you move up in power.

Mazdaspeed Camshafts for DISI MZR Motor

That being said, if you’re already having a motor built, or you happen to be going inside your motor, its not a bad idea at all to toss these cams in. They will only help you, and if anything, help your car to not need to work so hard when you’re pushing its limits.

Performance Throttle Body for 2006-2013 DISI MZR Mazdaspeed

To top that off something like our CorkSport Throttle Body has been proven to make more horsepower and flow 33% more CFM than the OEM unit. Up until recently, no other throttle body has been a viable option due to drivability issues. But CS now offers a drop in plug and play unit that doesn’t come with the problems and utilizes OEM ECU logic to function. Modifications like the throttle body are the awesome little bonuses you can do to help the car hit that 500 Whp mark even easier.

Let’s Recap

So, to cover everything that we’ve learned:
This is what we recommend to achieve 500 WHP

1. Built Motor with upgraded Cam Shafts
2. Auxiliary Fueling
3. Full Bolt-Ons, CS Throttle Body recommended.
4. CST5 Turbocharger
5. Manifolds

We hope you enjoyed reading this blog, and now have a better understanding of the details that go into making 500 whp. Next, we will be reviewing the in’s and out’s of 600 whp!

CorkSport Mazdaspeed 6 Front Mount Intercooler

The MS6 FMIC installation gives you a stealth install with minor trimming and allows you to keep the windshield washer bottle.

It’s been a long time coming but it has finally returned: the CorkSport Front Mount Intercooler Kit for Mazdaspeed 6! We’ve had many challenges on this project but we’re happy to report that it’s finally here and better than ever. We originally released this way back in 2012 (check out the release blog HERE for a throwback) but the only thing we kept from that kit was the intercooler core itself. All of the piping, silicone, and mounting has been redesigned for best fitment and minimizing trimming needed for install. Check out the images and full info below!

Superior to the factory Mazdaspeed 6 TMIC, the CorkSport FMIC gives you consistent cooling all the time without heat soak

To start things off, let’s look into the intercooler itself. It is a unique design where both the inlet and outlet point toward the driver’s side of the vehicle. This means our pipe routing is a little more complicated than most, but it makes it much easier to fit as you do not need to relocate your windshield washer bottle or deal with any of the fitment issues that come with squeezing a pipe through the passenger side of the car.

The bolt in Mazdaspeed 6 FMIC kit which makes it the best intercooler kit available.

The intercooler core is a high flowing, bar and plate design that measures 21”x10”x3”. This is good for efficient flow up to 500-550WHP yet adds minimal boost lag, even at lower power/boost levels. This big core fits snugly behind the crashbar to eliminate trimming the crashbar or your underbody shields. There is still some trimming required to fit the core and piping, however almost all of it is trimming on plastic components, with one metal cut on a thin sheet metal bracket.

Mazdaspeed 6 FMIC fits up to a 4 inch SRI

Moving onto the piping, the CS intercooler kit uses varied piping sizes for the hot and cold side intercooler pipes. The 2.25” hot side pipe ensures the charge air reaches the intercooler as fast as possible, helping reduce boost lag. The cold side uses 2.5” piping in the first half and 3” piping in the second half. Having this large volume of cool charge air directly in front of the throttle body helps with throttle response and the large diameter further helps with peak flow capacity. This piping setup has proven itself to work great on our GEN2 MS3 FMIC kit, and has been pushed to 684WHP on Barett’s GEN1 (he modified the GEN2 piping to fit his GEN1).

Wire reinforces silicone hoses make the Speed 6 FMIC a quality product

There was painstaking care taken to ensure the kit is as easy as possible to fit on your MS6. The hot pipe has a lot more freedom for intake fitments than our previous kit and we made sure all the CS intakes fit like a glove. Other aftermarket intakes have not been test fit but check out the images, they will give you a good idea if your SRI will fit or not. All the piping is mandrel bent and comes in a polished finish, so it is ready to install right out of the box and look and perform great!

Keeping everything together is the custom designed silicone couplers. You may notice that some of the silicone sections are longer than a typical silicone coupler. This is to ensure the best fitment as some shapes can simply not be made easily in a piece of pipe.

As with most CS silicone components, each coupler uses 4-plys of nylon reinforcement braiding and 5 layers of silicone. This is typically very good at resisting expansion under high levels of boost; however, we wanted to really make sure the long couplers of the MS6 kit do not expand. Any coupler longer than about 6” uses an extra layer reinforcement made of metal wire. This further resists expansion under boost, and even helps keep all the piping stable between mounting locations. While the outside of the coupler may look bumpy, the insides are still very smooth like a typical piece of silicone.

A complete FMIC for the speed6, everything you need to install is included except the tools

Each Mazdaspeed 6 intercooler kit comes with everything you need for install. Stainless steel T-bolt clamps are included for each connection to ensure secure, leak free joints. The intercooler mounting bracket, hardware, and full color install instructions are also included so you know you can get the job done right.

The MS6 FMIC installation gives you a stealth install with minor trimming and allows you to keep the windshield washer bottle.

We’re happy to finally have this out and are excited to see you all get your hands on them. Be sure to drop any questions you may have below and check out the product listing for more images!

Easy and Accurate Boost Readings: The CorkSport 4.5Bar MAP Sensor

Mazdaspeed 3 4.5 bar MAP sensor

We are proud to introduce the release of a new product: the CorkSport 4.5Bar MAP Sensor for Mazdaspeed 3, Mazdaspeed 6, and Mazda CX-7 Turbo. We’ve had the CS 3.5 Bar MAP Sensor for a while now as it’s a necessity when targeting over 21psi, however, while maxing out the CST6, we found the 35psi ceiling of the 3.5Bar sensor just wasn’t enough. Enter the CS 4.5Bar MAP Sensor!

Mazdaspeed 3 4.5 bar MAP sensor

Before I get into explaining what makes this sensor tick, lets quickly go over what exactly a MAP sensor does on your Mazdaspeed. Manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensors in a nutshell just read the pressure present in the intake manifold of your car. During normal driving conditions, the sensor is typically reading vacuum (or negative pressure) as the engine sucks in air. While in boost, the sensor reads the positive pressure (boost pressure) produced by your turbocharger. In both situations, this pressure reading is being sent to the ECU so the ECU understands exactly what the engine is doing.

The OEM sensor is a 2.5Bar unit, meaning it can do 1Bar of vacuum (negative pressure) leaving you only 1.5Bar (~21psi) before the sensor runs out of accuracy. Both the CS MAP Sensors allow you to accurately read boost levels higher than the stock sensor, so your tuner can target a higher boost pressure for more power, provided you have the right supporting mods. The sensors themselves do not increase your boost pressure, they simply enable your tuner to safely do so.

Mazdaspeed 6 plug in 4.5 bar MAP sensor

Enough learning, let’s get into the 4.5Bar Sensor! The CorkSport 4.5Bar MAP Sensor can read a maximum boost pressure of ~48psi before it starts running out of accuracy. Having a huge potential boost pressure means nothing without a fast responding sensor, so we designed the CS 4.5Bar MAP Sensor to have near instantaneous response of only 2 milliseconds. This means if you have the build and turbocharger to do so, this sensor is ready for just about anything you want to throw at it.

A true plug in MAP sensor for your Mazdaspeed no adapter required

The CorkSport 4.5Bar MAP sensor uses a custom injection molded body that mimics the OEM sensor. This makes it a direct install into the OEM location and a direct plug into the OEM wiring harness. No wiring or adapter harness needed. This results in a clean install that takes as little as 15-30 minutes! 

Everything needed for installation is included with the CS 4.5Bar MAP sensor. A new mounting bolt is supplied to ensure everything stays put, while a fresh O-ring is attached to the sensor to provide a good seal in your intake manifold. To top it off, calibrating for the sensor is easy as the calibration for use with Cobb Accessport is laser etched right on the body of the sensor.

Speed3 3 bar MAP sensor

Mazdaspeed EWGs Made Easy!

We’ve talked a lot about external wastegates with our recent CST6 development but today we are happy to announce the standalone CorkSport External Wastegate Housings for the CST4 and CST5. Available right now as an update for your existing IWG CST4 or CST5, the CS EWG housings make it easy to get the best in boost control for your Mazdaspeed 3, Mazdaspeed 6, or Mazda CX-7 Turbo.

Bolton upgrade to go external wastegate with your Mazdaspeed

While the CST6 will only come with an EWG housing, the external wastegate (EWG for short) is a new concept for the CST4 and CST5. Both of these turbos originally hit the market with an internal wastegate (IWG) only option that has a small flapper valve on the inside of the turbine housing to let off excess exhaust gases. Instead, the CorkSport EWG housings use an offshoot from the turbine scroll that has a v-band flange on the end. This flange allows for the fitment of an external wastegate for improved boost control. To run an EWG on an original CST4 or CST5 previously, you needed an EWG capable exhaust manifold and some sort of block off for the IWG port.


Mazdaspeed 3 turbo internal and external wastegate housings

The new CS EWG housings make running an EWG on your Mazdaspeed3 easier than ever. Each housing comes with the elbow and clamp needed for great fitment. We even offer a dump tube/screamer pipe that works for both MS3 and MS6 as an add-on option. If you pick up the screamer pipe to go with your housing, all you need to supply is the EWG itself. 

Mazdaspeed external wastegate installation kit includes everything but the Tial wastegate

We strongly recommend a Tial MV-R 44mm wastegate as all design work and testing used this specific wastegate. Other wastegates may require modification for use. The 44mm size is a great fit for the Mazdaspeed engines, whether you are running an upgraded turbo on the stock block or fully built one that you intend to push to the limits.


Tial wastegates are a proven turbo commodity for the Mazdaspeed 3

So why would you want an EWG? For starters, EWGs truly offer the best boost control setup for any turbocharged car. Because the wastegate is separate from the turbocharger itself, it is easier to place for optimum boost control, plus, the design of the actuator itself can be optimized. As a result you get a wastegate that hits boost targets more accurately and responds quicker to changes in boost. This means no more boost spikes right when the boost hits (a common problem with poor quality IWG setups), and a near-flat boost curve. The isolated actuator also makes for faster and easier spring changes should you need to service or change your wastegate preload. For more info on the design behind the CS EWG housing, check out the full blog HERE.

A direct flow path for the exhaust gas on the Mazdaspeed 3

One of the best parts of EWG over IWG is the sounds that come with a screamer pipe! While only intended for off-road use, a screamer pipe dumps the exhaust from the EWG directly to the air. This allows for a fantastic noise during a WOT pull, that sounds truly unique. It’s not all just noise though, by venting the EWG to the atmosphere instead of venting the IWG in your downpipe, you are decreasing exhaust turbulence right after the turbine wheel, reducing backpressure. On very high horsepower setups, this often generates some extra power as the turbine housing can be used more efficiently. Check out the product video below for some great EWG sounds from Barett’s MS3.

There’s one final benefit of the CS EWG housings: housing design itself. Without having the IWG in the way to worry about, we were able to do some optimizing on the scroll and A/R. For CST4 owners, this means an increase in A/R from 0.66 to 0.82. Typically an A/R change like this will cause a slight decrease in spool time but an increase in max power potential. CST5 owners have this 0.82 A/R even with the IWG setup but there’s another benefit: greater swallowing capacity. This refers to the amount of volume in the turbine scroll. By increasing the swallowing capacity the turbine can ingest air more efficiently at the peak, which is especially important if you have an upgraded exhaust manifold or high flowing head. After all, an engine is an air pump – what good is shoving more air in if you can’t get it out?

Easy bolt up external wastegate upgrade for your Mazdaspeed 3

If you’re in the market for a change on your Mazdaspeed, check out the CorkSport EWG housings for the CST4 and CST5 turbochargers. Better boost control, a more efficient housing, and best of all, a great new sound. Be sure to check out the listing for even more images and don’t be shy to ask questions we’ll be happy to help!

CST5 Spools!! Testing and Validation

We’re back on the new CorkSport turbocharger lineup again with today’s blog, this time focusing on the testing & validation of the “medium big” turbo, the CST5. Just in case you missed it, the CST4 (formerly known as the CorkSport 18G) is getting some company to go along with its new swanky name. Check out the full lineup here and the design behind the CST5 here. Now that you’ve read all that, let’s get into what you’re really here for, testing & dyno numbers.

We started with the internal wastegate option, to validate the CST5 for drop-in fitment. Since we’ve had great experience with the drop-in CST4, we knew how to design a turbo around the tight confines of the Mazdaspeed engine bay. The CST5 fit great in the OEM location with just a few minor revisions for proper fitment. It looks pretty good in there too if we do say so ourselves!

Next the car got put on the dyno for tuning and to push the new CST5 to its limits. With a little help from our friend Will at PD Tuning, the CST5 was soon putting down some impressive numbers. We started off with a “calm” boost level of ~25psi. This netted us 450WHP and spool time that surprised us, achieving 20psi by 3500-3600RPM. Turning up the boost and pushing the turbo to its limits, we achieved 519WHP at ~30-31psi on Barett’s built GEN1 MS3. Check out the dyno graph below.

Taking the car out on the street surprised us further at just how early the car was building boost for this size of turbo. Road logs showed that we were making 20psi slightly sooner than on the dyno (3400-3500RPM) but even more surprisingly the CST5 was making 30psi by 3700-3800RPM! Obviously this is an aggressive tune that would most likely kill a stock block, but, the CST5 can be tuned to be stock block friendly and still make good power.

Then came the testing on the EWG variant of the CST5. We had developed fitment for the CST6 which meant the CST5 had no issues upon install on both MS3 and MS6. Next was a quick retune and some power runs. The larger swallowing capacity of the EWG housing meant some extra power at peak, yet spool was nearly unchanged. We made 525WHP at the same ~30-31psi.

Comparing the IWG and EWG turbine housings you can see a small variation in the graphs.  This variation is mainly due to the change from internally waste-gated and externally waste-gated.  The EWG setup provides more precise boost control through the RPM range. The EWG setup allows us to better tune the “torque spike” around 4200rpm vs the IWG setup.  For peak power the IWG and EWG housings are within the margin of error which makes since because they are both 0.82 A/R housings.

Further supporting the IWG and EWG setups, both options allow you to tune the spring pressure so you can better setup your CST5 and Speed for the fuel and boost levels you want and of course the most noticeable difference is what you hear. What’s an EWG without a screamer pipe!  

Wrapping up testing showed exactly what we were hoping for with the CST5: a great middle ground between the existing CST4 and the upcoming CST6 that can be used on both high powered stock block and fully built cars. Our testing continues as this blog is written as the CST5 is being beta tested by a close friend of CS with a freshly built Dankai 2.

There’s more to come from the new CorkSport turbo lineup so stay tuned for more info on the CST5, CST6, and EWG housings.

-Daniel @ CorkSport