Dyno Numbers and You

We talk a lot about dyno testing and seeing improvements with CorkSport goodies but we rarely talk about what dynos are and why dyno testing should be a part of your build. While e-tuning using logs and v-dyno works great, tuning on a chassis dyno can be quicker and is a just a bit safer; since let’s be honest, 4th gear WOT pulls in your local area of “Mexico” can get a little sketchy sometimes. Keep reading on for some advantages of knowing your dyno numbers.

To start off, I wanted to share a little bit of knowledge of what a dynamometer (dyno for short) is and how they work. Dyno is a broad term for a machine that measures force, torque, or power. In the automotive world, we typically think of a chassis dyno that measures torque through the drivetrain of a vehicle, however, for high-level suspension tuning, shock dynos also exist. Now some of you may be surprised to hear that dynos measure torque, not horsepower. Torque is much easier to measure and can be easily converted to horsepower (HP equals torque times RPM divided by 5252 for those curious).

There are a couple names of dyno you have likely seen get thrown around: Dynojet, Mustang, Dynapack, and DynoTech to name some of the most common. Each measure power a little differently but for the sake of keeping things concise, each uses a known or controlled “resistance” to fight the vehicle’s torque that is being produced.

Dynojet and some Mustang dynos use a physically heavy drum while Dynapack, DynoTech, and other Mustang dynos use electricity or hydraulics to control the dyno’s “resistance”. Each type of dyno has its own set of advantages & disadvantages but the most important thing to remember is that they will read differently for the same vehicle. This means if you are getting your car tested or tuned on a dyno multiple times, be sure to use the same type, and better yet same exact dyno, to really see how your build has affected your horsepower & torque.

On to advantages of getting your car dyno tested. While most are not “make it or break it” changes, dyno testing can really take your build to the next level.

Bragging Rights: While an obvious one, dyno results make it much easier to compare your car to another since you have hard data to back you up. This is especially true if you are using the same type of dyno. On a lighter note, comparing your car to someone with a well-documented build can help you decide what your next mod will be.

Ease of Tuning: Consistent and accurate pulls can be had back to back on a dyno, without having to drive out to your “dyno road” after every small tuning change. In a properly setup environment, pulls will show only tuning changes instead of having to worry about every little variable that comes with on-road pulls. If your tuner is in town, having them live tune with your car right in front of them can turn a multi-week e-tuning process into a long afternoon. Plus, you won’t have to worry about an expensive ticket from the local boys in blue.

Monitoring Car Health: Friend has the same car, same mods yet are making much more horsepower? Dyno testing can show things like this that may indicate a big problem with your ride. Removing the “driver mod” from racing your friend light to light can help determine if there’s something more going on. In addition, having hard data on power & torque numbers can tell you when to stop pushing for one more psi, keeping your ride on the road and not in pieces.

New Mod Validation: Bought a part and want to see what it’s doing for you? A dyno before and after is a great way to validate your new mods and see what your next step should be. In addition, you may find out there are more benefits to a part than just max power gains. Maybe that newest part only gave you +2WHP at peak but shows gains of 10-15 through the middle of the rev range, or you can hold power to a higher RPM. Analyzing dyno graphs for more than just peak numbers is a powerful tool that can indicate how a part changes how a car feels.

Obviously, not everyone has access to a dyno and it is usually expensive to use a dyno for more than a few pulls, however, it is worth it and can give you some much-needed info about your ride while keeping you & your ride safe and out of legal trouble.

Looking for a dyno for your car? We are hosting the 2018 CorkSport Dyno Day in August. Dyno runs, food, a car show, and even drag racing are all on the agenda. Check out the Facebook event page for full details & don’t be shy if you don’t have a Mazda-we had a Fiat 500 Abarth on the rollers last year!

Hope to see you there!

-Daniel

Why Lowering Springs?

Everything to know about lowering your Mazda with lowering springs.

Whether you want the better handling that comes with the lowered center of gravity, or you want to rid yourself of the wheel gap eyesore.  Lowering springs will give you want you’re looking for.

For running the track, or a spirited drive through the countryside, CorkSport lowering springs are the upgrade you’ve been looking for. By adding lowering springs and lowering the center of gravity of your Mazda allows the car to stay more planted to the road.

One of the biggest things to note on stock suspension is how far upward the suspension travels when hitting a bump. It can make the car feel like it wants to lift off of the road; depending on how fast you’re taking corners. Lowering springs help to correct the car’s suspension travel when you hit a bump in a turn.

Corksport Mazda 3 racer

Lowering springs also have about 25% increased stiffness. For the Mazdaspeed platform, increased stiffness in the rear is a must. Mazdaspeeds like to squat pretty hard when hitting full boost, so any way you can manage to stiffen up the rear is a great modification for your car.

Adding lowering springs also gives your baby amazing eye appeal and a much more aggressive look. Whether you drive a Mazdaspeed3Mazdaspeed6Mazda 3, Mazda 6, CX-5, CX-3 or MX-5, lowering springs will get rid of that ugly wheel well gap. The result is a Mazda that carries a much cleaner and more aggressive look and gives you the ability to take it to the track if you want to.

Drop your Mazda for an aggressive look and better handling with the CorkSport lowering springs.

Some people want to drop their Mazda as much as possible, and some don’t. CorkSport lowering springs don’t deliver a super aggressive drop. If you’re not interested in scraping your front bumper on every road bump, the CorkSport lowering springs have the right drop for you, and provide the increased handling capabilities you’re looking for.

 

If you’re curious about other suspension pieces for your Mazdaspeed, check out our Struts and Shocks combo kits, that give you just what you need for suspension.

The Race Car Romance

I recently had the opportunity to interview one of my favorite up and coming racers and wanted to share with you some of her advice and story. This is just an awesome look into the winning mentality of one of SCCA’s Wendi Allen Scholarship prominent women Racers! From where she started to where she’s headed and some info in between, you’ll get a chance to hear direct from Johanna Foege in this interview.

How long have you been racing? What got you started?
My brothers both got involved with auto-crossing while I was in college and were always trying to convince me to come out and race with them. It wasn’t until the end of 2011 when a friend offered me a codrive in their Mazda3 (and a year after I purchased my first MazdaSpeed3) that I finally gave it a try.

At that first event, I ended up taking first in my novice (open) class of 7, on my first run, nonetheless! Naturally, I was immediately hooked.

What have been the best outcomes for you since starting racing?
This year I received the SCCA Wendi Allen Scholarship. I suppose this means that I’ve made enough positive impressions on SCCA members to have been nominated for this award, which is intended for young women drivers that show promise at driving and inspiring other women. This scholarship has made a crazy year of racing possible for me, and I’m so grateful to have received the recognition and the opportunity to compete in 8 national tour events throughout 2018!

What have been your best standings thus far?
My first taste of victory was at a local event in Champaign, IL when I took the fastest run of the day (out of all the drivers), in the Mazdaspeed6 back in June 2014. I’ve only made it to one National event which was in September 2017 at Lincoln, NE, but I managed to trophy there, finishing 3rd in my class. And just last week at the Championship Tour Event in Peru, IN, I managed to finish 16th out of 275 drivers.

What do you believe is the best MOD for racing – if you had to pick the best one?
I think this entirely depends on your car and the kind of racing you do! For autocross, the rear sway bar has been my favorite in my Mazdaspeed3, as it helps combat the understeer, pushy front wheel drive characteristics. My favorite mod on the Mazdaspeed6 has been the custom valved, high spring rate coilover setup since that car has relatively soft suspension and a lot of body roll from the factory.

What is your favorite MOD – other than the Driver Mod, which we know you invested in already?
If awesome tires count as a mod, definitely that! All other mods depend entirely on how much grip your tires have on the surface at any given moment. This applies to the street, too. Also, have you seen our Hoosiers? 😝

What has been the most memorable mistake you’ve made on the track?
At 2017 SCCA SOLO Nationals, I had a KILLER run- 0.7 seconds faster than the rest of mine, and 0.5 seconds ahead of first place in my class. I’d been working on looking ahead while driving throughout the year and was doing such a good job of this that I hit a cone that was right in front of me on that run. I remember seeing it at the last second and thinking, “There’s no way I’m getting around that now!” What I didn’t know at that moment, was that cone was going to cost me first place at my first Nationals.


What is your best advice for other Drivers starting out?
Take a school, ask people for help and advice (and be receptive to it), and don’t give up! Don’t be too hard on yourself, driving skills take a long time to polish, and do come more naturally to some people. In the end, racing is really about mental preparation, confidence, and ambition composure on course.

Why do you believe women in racing is important?
I think it’s time we see a paradigm shift about the activities that women (and men) pursue. I’m all about supporting whatever healthy hobbies people find themselves interested in, and I don’t think there needs to be gender stereotypes associated with any of them. I love to see women participating in motorsports because it serves as a reminder to all that we are on the same playing field as men, and are capable of just as much. As more women enter the world of racing, I really hope it opens the door to other ladies feeling comfortable pursuing what has historically been an atypical interest. I just hear way too many women say “That’s so cool that you race, but I could never do that!” You can, and you should give it a try!!! Maybe someday, they will.

Lastly, feel free to add anything you’d like the public to know about you, your car or your racing experience!
I’ve made efforts in the Mazdaspeed (forum) community to support and encourage all members, but particularly other women, to participate in the sport of autocross. I’ve taken part in organizing four different national meets, and assured autocross was on our schedule at each one. I also made myself available to instruct at these events, and really focused on getting the women members to take part with me. I’ve gotten several of the local member’s girlfriends into the driver’s seat at autocross events as well. It has been rewarding to watch them find enjoyment from it and helping them grow into better drivers, as many have found it easier to learn from a fellow woman, than their significant other, lol.

My teammate and partner of 5 years, Clint, and I live nearly 600 miles apart. He’s been my inspiration, engineer, coach, mechanic, and best friend all along, and I credit him for bringing me to where I am today, and for building us an amazingly capable and unique car. I just started a blog to keep track of our long-distance relationship racing adventures this year, as well as driving tips, goals, and my progress through each event! www.TheRacecarRomance.com

Caring for your Mazda in Summer

As temperatures rise, your Mazda is going to feel the heat. With all of the road trips and picture-perfect drives, you need to keep your baby looking good and driving well. We rounded up the top summer care tips that the CorkSport community submitted to us on Facebook and added in a few of our own.

Search for shade

The sun can damage your car’s paint job and interior materials. Keep your Mazda safe by parking in the shade or using a garage whenever possible. Not only will it keep the interior from being a blazing heat soaked oven, it will do a little more to keep you and your Mazdaspeed comfortable! 

Get fresh fluids

Keep your Mazda running smoothly during the hot summer months with fresh fluids in your coolant system. It will protect your engine and keep your AC cold as ice. Keep in mind that your intercooler will be working overtime in the coming temperatures, might as well give it that extra boost of topping off the fluids.

Check your oil

Oil is your car’s lifeblood. Regular oil changes are the cheapest way to extend the life of your Mazda and keep it performing at its best. Change your oil before your next big road trip or if it’s been longer than three months since your last change. You can also look into cleaning out your oil catch can, as it’s been protecting your engine from some extra gunk for a while!

Give her a proper wash

This is crucial for keeping your Mazda looking good and preserving the paint. Be sure that you’re cleaning the brush that you’re using so you don’t scratch her, and the pre-soak is there for a reason! Check out our thoughts on ceramic coating that can protect your paint!

Keep the interior fresh

Exterior shots are sexy but you spend most of your time inside your Mazda so don’t forget about keeping your interior clean. We have customers that use vinyl conditioner to keep their interior pure and preserve its matte metallic finish. Since you’ll be spending a lot of time inside your ride, you might think about upgrading the interior components for that luxury feel, the Corksport Alcantara Steering wheel or shift knob is a great start! 

Maintain a sexy shine

Now that your interior is fresh and the exterior is washed, it’s time to get that sexy shine. Kiefer Westlund, a professional detailer, and John Lukis a CorkSport 7th Gear Member recommend regular waxing using Meguiar’s Ultimate Liquid Wax. Meguiar’s wax sells for $25 per bottle, which will last for many washes. For more tips on keeping your exterior shine, check out our blog post on how to keep that new Mazda sheen.

Now you’re ready to take on the hottest months of the summer performing well under the hood and looking good.

Cheers,

CorkSport

Interior LED Light Set for 2016+ Mazda CX-3 and Mazda CX-9

Sometimes it’s the simplest changes to a vehicle that can really make a difference.  A crisp and well-lit interior makes for a surprising improvement. CorkSport is proud to announce that we now have LED kits for 2016+ Mazda CX-3 and 2016+ Mazda CX-9.  

The CorkSport LED Light Kit replaces all interior and some exterior lights that are normally yellow incandescent bulbs.  All CorkSport LEDs are the 7000k color for a pleasant, but bright and clear illumination.

Check out a comparison of the CorkSport LEDs vs the standard incandescent bulb.  

Sure, you can probably find some random lower-quality LEDs online, but only at CorkSport will you get a complete kit with exactly the bulbs you need along with color installation instructions, a CorkSport tin and top notch customer service.  

-BS @ CS

2016+ CX-3 LED KIT         

2016+ CX-9 LED KIT