2018-2021 Mazda 6 Turbo Lowering Springs 2.0

2018-2021 Mazda 6 Turbo Drop Springs

A couple years ago we developed performance lowering springs for the new 2018-2021 Mazda 6.  Our goal was to transform the full size sedan from a commuter to a fun luxury sedan you can daily and enjoy in the back country roads.  While we succeeded, we also heard from the community that you wanted more LOW LOW.  V2.0 gives you exactly that!

Let’s start off with the big one: ride height changes. The V2.0 springs offer a more aggressive drop from the stock springs with about 1.75 inch lower in the front and about 2.00 inches lower in the rear. This height is more aggressive than the previous CorkSport Sport Lowering Springs (1.00in front & 0.75in rear) while still maintaining good ride characteristics for the daily commute.

The height drop will be noticed when you’re outside the car, but the handling improvements will be apparent when driving. By lowering the center of gravity and stiffening the springs, body roll is reduced in corners, giving you extra confidence when attacking that backroad. In addition, we stiffened the rear springs more than the fronts, reducing understeer. By number, this meant 4.6K front springs and 8.1k rear springs). Derrick, our resident racecar driver and MZ6T owner, loves the new V2.0 springs and is sitting on some Rays 57FXZ 18×10+40 with 265/40 tires.

While this may sound like a big jump, they ride very similar to the OEM springs, but do feel stiffer. We used natural frequency analysis to ensure we achieved comfortable characteristics. This affects how the car feels and responds when going over bumps, braking, accelerating, and through corners. While the overall spring rates are stiffer, the overall ride quality will not suffer like a Honda Civic on cut stock coils.  

Last but not least, the CS Sport Lowering Springs are made from high tensile strength spring steel and come powder coated in our new CS Blue for long lasting quality and corrosion resistance. They install just like stock, reusing all your OEM components. The only permanent modification is trimming the bump stops to match OEM suspension travel.

Be sure to check out the product listing HERE for more images, a product video with more comparisons to OEM, and pricing. Make your new Mazda 6 yours with just the right styling and handling boost from CorkSport.

Gen4 Mazda 3 Turbo Performance Lowering Springs

Putting a turbocharged engine in the GEN4 Mazda 3 was a step in the right direction for Mazda but it still misses the mark of a “hot hatch”. Well that’s where we come in! Introducing the CorkSport Lowering Springs for 2021+ Mazda 3 Turbo. We took what we learned from the naturally aspirated 3 and applied it to the slightly heftier turbo models. This resulted in a great new ride height and improved handling to push the GEN4 closer to a hot hatch, without ruining the daily driving comfort. Read on for full details and images of the great new look!

Let’s start off with what everyone wants to know: ride height! With only one driveline & transmission option, we could really dial in the ride height for both turbo hatchback and sedan models. The CS lowering springs for the turbo models offer a similar ride height drop to the N/A models. For the turbo hatchback, this means a ride height drop of approximately 1.5” in the front and 1.8” in the rear. For the slightly heavier turbo sedan, expect a drop of 1.5” in the front and 1.9” in the rear. While the sedan is a slightly larger drop in the rear than the hatchback, it still sits level and looks great!

This ride height is low enough to look great yet not too low to cause you issues on your daily commute. We found that this ride height can clear most driveways and speed bumps no problem. On really steep driveways, taking it slow and at an angle will help you keep your front bumper safe. We haven’t really found a driveway that was an issue though! One final note: we did test our regular, non-turbo Mazda 3 springs on a turbo car. While they fit, the extra weight from the turbo system had the car sitting way too low in the front & looking ugly. We would not recommend doing this!

Moving on to the next best benefit from lowering springs: handling! The CorkSport lowering springs offer some much needed sharpness to the MZ3-T. By lowering the ride height, you lower the center of gravity of the vehicle. Combining this with stiffer than OEM spring rates, body roll is reduced, which greatly helps driver confidence through the twisties. We carefully chose our upgraded spring rates to also help reduce understeer when at the limit of traction. By increasing the rear spring rate more than the front, your turbo 3 gets better turn in and more neutral handling.

The final spring rate numbers for the Mazda 3 2.5T lowering springs actually surprised us. We tested a few different spring rate combinations to find the best balance of ride and handling. Ultimately, the same spring rates as the naturally aspirated Mazda 3 won out (this was due to both cars using the same suspension design). A 3.4K front spring and a 5.9K rear spring offered a compliant ride for daily driving, yet great handling characteristics on a backroad. The OEM dampers on the turbo models are just a hair stiffer as well, so the increase in spring rate fits fantastic with no bouncy ride!

Each set of CorkSport lowering springs for Mazda 3 turbo are made specifically to fit directly in place of the OEM springs. The only small modification that is needed is to trim the bump stops to allow for correct suspension travel before the bump stop is contacted at the new lower ride height. The springs are all made from high tensile strength spring steel. This ensures a consistently performing spring that will stand the test of time and will not settle. We finish off each spring with a powdercoated red finish. We chose red instead of the typical CS blue to help the turbo models stand out and because red things are proven to go faster! We even include a spring silencer on the rear springs to prevent any noises.

That about wraps up the launch of the CorkSport Lowering Springs for Mazda 3 Turbo. Check out the product listing at the link below for more pictures. Be sure to give us a call with any questions you have, we’re happy to help!

P.S. The car in the above images is riding on Advan GT wheels in 19×8.5 +38 size, wrapped in Kumho 235/35 R19 summer tires.

Mazdaspeed 3 Port Injection Fuel Kit

Its 2021, you survived 2020 and finally got those last goodies installed on your Mazdaspeed 3…you’re finally fully bolted.  It’s been about 6 months and now you want more, but your Tuner keeps telling you you are out of fuel. What the Hell does that mean!?

Let me tell what that means and let me show you the solution via the BEST Port Injection Fuel Kit for your Mazdaspeed 3 or MPS 3.  If you know this is the kit for you don’t wait any longer (Link to ALL THE FUEL), but I do invite you to check out the great information below. 

Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Say no to “out of fuel” and say yes to enough fuel to support 750+WHP!  But first let’s take a step back to understand the basics. 

Why is your Mazdaspeed 3 “out of fuel”?

The Mazdaspeed 3 and 6 use early technology for direct injection injectors which sadly do not have an aftermarket replacement and reach their flow capacity limit quickly.  This basically puts a limit on the OEM fuel systems horsepower capacity.  From what we have seen firsthand and in the community; the limit is around 360-390whp depending on the performance parts on the engine and the fuel used.  The only current solution is to add a port injection system with either 2 extra or 4 extra injectors.  We’ll talk more about that. 

Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

What is an auxiliary port injection fuel system? – This is a kit that adds (does not replace) port style fuel injectors to the intake manifold so that you can increase the total fueling capacity of your Mazdaspeed or MPS.  There are a few ways this can be done and all have been done in the Mazdaspeed Community. 

2 extra or 4 extra injectors (aka 6th Port or 8th Port Injection)

While the CorkSport Port Injection Fuel Kit is designed for 4 extra injectors (8th Port Kit); there are options in the community that only use 2 extra injectors (6th Port Kit).   CorkSport believes the 8th Port Injection kit is the superior setup because it has higher capacity, is more reliable and safer for the engine.

With an 8th Port Kit there is an extra injector on each runner of the intake manifold spraying directly into that one and only runner.  With a 6th Port Kit there are two extra injectors spraying directly ahead of the throttle body and then depending on the flow distribution of the intake manifold to disperse the fuel to each runner and thus cylinder.

Return vs Returnless Setups

This is another option for Port Injection Fuel Kits in the community.  While both have their place, the CorkSport 8th Port Fuel Kit uses a “return” style setup because again it has higher capacity, is more reliable and safer for the engine because it is easier to tune for.

In a “return” style setup the fuel pressure for the extra injectors increase as boost pressure increases keeping a consistent fuel flow rate per injector duty cycle which provides the higher capacity and much more consistent tuning.  While the “returnless” style setup just plumbs the extra injectors into the OEM fuel feed to the HPFP.  The fuel pressure does not increase with boost pressure and therefore the capacity is lower, around 500-550WHP.

Integrated vs Standalone Fuel System

Lastly is the consideration of how the Port Injection Injectors are fueled.  This can come from the OEM fuel tank or from a completely separate fuel tank in the vehicle.  Unlike the bullets points above, this is not really a “one is better than the other”, but more of “what suits the needs of your vehicle and uses”. 

Integrated Setup

As the name implies this means the Port Injection Fuel Kit sources its fuel from the OEM tank and in-tank pump.  This can actually be done a couple ways 1) via the “returnless” setup as mentioned above but that has its issues or 2) via a surge tank that is mounted in the engine bay or cabin…which has some concerns.

The surge tank setup is a very common “racecar” setup and for good reason.  It handles high G load corning, acceleration, and braking great and also fuels the entire car, not just the port injection system.  However the cost is usually much higher and requires relocation of other engine bay components so you can mount the surge tank. Along with that you can only use one fuel for the entire system so if your car needs a special high octane fuel then you have to use it at all times during operation, whether cruising or full power.

Standalone Setup

In contrary this is a completely separate fuel source via a separate tank.  This can be a really great option for the enthusiast that does some spirited driving, maybe some events here and there, but also daily drives their Mazdaspeed 3.  How is this the case?

With a completely separate fuel cell for the port injection system you can run the exotic race gas/ethanol in the port injection tank and run normal cheap pump gas in the OEM tank.  When you daily drive/cruise you only use the pump gas in the OEM tank and when you want power the port injection kicks in with the high octane fuel.  It’s a win/win, especially if you do not have ethanol close by and have to special order the exotic fuel like we do here in the PNW.  However this does mean you need a 2nd fuel tank for the port injection which can be a pain, BUT CorkSport has that covered in this complete kit

Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Ok let’s recap on where the CorkSport Port Injection Kit for Mazdaspeed 3 fits in:

  • 4 Extra Injectors aka 8th Port Fuel Injection Kit – one injector per runner for more precise fueling
  • Return Style Setup – Fuel pressure rising with boost pressure for more capacity and precision
  • Standalone Tank – Cheap pump gas for daily driving and high octane fuel for port injection power in the secondary fuel cell

I don’t know about you, but this sounds like you can have your cake and eat it to!

CORKSPORT MAZDA PERFORMANCE BLOG

Image Credit: Shift Sector Coalinga 2020

Let’s look at the components that make up the CorkSport Port Injection Fuel Kit.  What’s in the Box:

CorkSport Fender Mounted Fuel Cell

This is a huge element of what makes the CorkSport Port Injection Fuel Kit great.  This fuel cell is custom CAD designed specifically for your GEN1 and GEN2 Mazdaspeed 3 to fit hidden under the headlight behind the bumper cover.  At 2.6 gallons capacity you don’t need to refill the fuel cell often and there is an integrated level sensor to remind you when you are at 0.8 gallons.  No in-cab tanks and smells. 

Mazdaspeed 3 Fender Mounted Auxiliary Fuel Cell

Quantum Fuel Pump

  • A 380LPH inline fuel pump is used.  This is a Bosch 044 style pump that has the flow capacity needed and is e85 safe.
Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

DeatschWerks Fuel Filters

  • Two fuel filters are used in the system for complete filtration.  A pre-pump 100 micron filter filters the fuel flowing from the tank to the pump, therefore protection the pump from debris.  A post-pump 10 micron filter filters the fuel even more before entering the fuel injectors, therefore protecting the fuel injectors from very small particulates.  Both filters use a dual stage filtration design that incorporates a magnet and a stainless steel mesh media.
Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Spec’d Length 6AN Fuel Lines

  • No headaches and ready to go! Like our Mazdaspeed high pressure fuel line, the included fuel lines are the CorkSport Fuel Lines are spec’d to length and fully assembled ready to use.  The lines are PTFE lined with stainless steel braiding and a hytrel coating for a sleek finish and protection against abrasion.  All fittings minus on 150deg fitting are permanently crimped and sealed.
Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Fuel Pressure Regulator

  • An AEM fuel pressure regulator is used for this return style setup.  This provides easy adjustment and setup of the fuel rail pressure with the included Fuel Lab Analog Pressure Gauge
Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Electronics

  • Too further simplify, a 30amp relay kit is provided.  Relays are a critical component in setting up a port injection fuel system.  This allows you to safely and reliably provide power and control to the fuel pump. With that a Hobbs Switch is also provided, this acts as a trigger for the relay to apply power to the fuel pump when a set boost pressure is met.  Example: when you reach 4psi the Hobbs Switch will signal the relay to apply power to the fuel pump.  This is a great setup for daily driven cars because you only turn on the pump when needed vs running at all times.  It greatly helps the life of your pump.
Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Misc Hardware

  • Lastly is all the misc hardware and brackets to get this into your speed.  We’ve got this handled and clearly show the install process with the online color step-by-step instructions.
Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Alright that’s what’s in the box for the CorkSport Port Injection Kit; now let’s talk about the other required items.  There are 2-3 critical items needed to get your port injection kit up and running.  

Port Injection Controller

  • The OEM ECU and Cobb/Versatuner tuning options cannot control the extra 4x injectors in the kit so you will need a separate controller and software for this.  There is a simple and proven option with the Split Second Additional Injector Controller AIC1.  It comes with a ready to run harness for EV6 injectors and the harness integration for power, signal and control are very simple.  Check it out here and add it to your CorkSport Port Injection Kit for a one stop shop.
Split Second Injector Controller AIC1-V4H EV6 for Auxiliary Fuel System

Injectors

  • You will need 4x injectors for the CorkSport 8th Port Fuel Kit.  The injectors need to have 14mm o-rings top and bottom and the length of 34mm or 48mm (if using the CorkSport intake manifold).  To use with the Split Second Additional Injector Controller AIC1; you will want the EV6 connection style. For capacity we recommend at least 1000cc/mm.  To cover all these requirements just use the Injector Dynamics ID1050x.  They are proven and reliable, you can grab a set right here with the CorkSport Port Injection Kit.
Injector Dynamics 1050x Port Injectors for Auxiliary Fuel System

Bonus!

  • While this is not required for operation, it is highly recommended.  The N2MB Racing WOT Box allows you to change the type of Redline and Launch Control cut to a safer method.  OEM will deactivate the injectors for this vs the WOT Box deactivates the spark plugs.  This is much safer for your engine, especially with running a port injection fuel kit.  With this you can also Flat Foot Shift which is faster and way too much fun. (Insert Fireball Emoji Here)

Why doesn’t the CorkSport Port Injection Fuel Kit include these items? 

That’s a good question and we have a good reason.  Originally the kit was going to, but we asked the community how they would want the kit and the answers surprised us.  A lot of people wanted the kit minus the Controller and the Injectors because they already had those items.  So we pulled those out of the kit as solo items you can choose to add if needed.   

Installing this kit into your Mazdaspeed 3 is a day project with some buddies.  Bank on 6+ hours due to the wiring (its always tedious, but important to do right). Read the installation instructions before starting the install so you are ready with all the needed tools and supplies for wiring. 

Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

I do want to note that like any project that involves wiring, there will be some wiring required for the install and the extra wiring and connection you decide you need are not included in the CorkSport kit.  Every car is different and how each person wants to get things wired up is different.  There is also some very minimal drilling required to install the tank mounting brackets. 

CORKSPORT MAZDA PERFORMANCE BLOG

I hope you found this blog helpful and informative not just to learn about the CorkSport Port Injection Fuel Kit, but to also learn about the other setups and options you can choose from.  I hope this helps you decide what is best for your car and goals.  Give us a call if you have any questions, we’d be happy to help. 

Barett @ CS

Vinyl Wrap With a Split Personality

Stickers are worth 5hp right?…So it was only logical to wrap the whole car in a GIANT sticker!  Anyways, on a real note we knew that the @Halfmilespeed3 couldn’t just be fast, it had to look good and what Car Guy or Gal doesn’t want their car to look good?

We have a plan at CorkSport to wrap all of our R&D Shop Cars with an awesome blue that aligns with our “CorkSport Blue”, but we want each car to have a little unique character to it.  Thinking about the halfmilespeed3 build and goal we had the brilliant idea of a split wrap…seems fitting right? Half and Half…

So what did the car look like before the wrap?

2007-2009 Mazdaspeed 3
2007-2009 Mazdaspeed 3

Metro Grey Mica is the color name and its pretty bland in my opinion.   I added the white roof and hood accents along with white wheels to help brighten up the car, which it did, but it was time for change.  Oh yeah; white wheels and track spec brake pads don’t mix, just an FYI. 

So what is like to get your car wrapped?  What’s the process?  I can’t personally give you details as I did not do the wrap myself, but I was close to the action and watched it all come together.  Respect to those that take this on themselves and to the professionals out there.  It is a tedious process that requires attention to detail to get a great final result.  

Mazdaspeed Vinyl Wrap

A local friend is a professional and was open to doing the work in the CS shop since the Speed was not in a running and driving state at the time.  

Mazdaspeed Vinyl Wrap

Saul S. (@saulywood) did the work over a few weeks’ time in evenings and weekends.  He kicked a** on a project that turned out to be a bit more difficult than expected.  

Installing a wrap is a process of pulling, stretching, heating, cutting…lots of different skills and abilities to get the job done.  All this has to happen without damaging the vehicle you are wrapping.  It’s quite a feat.  

Mazdaspeed Vinyl Wrap

Going through the process the build kind of evolved if you will.  Luckily Saul was very open-minded to it and even a bit eager to try some new things. 

Probably my favorite aspect of the wrap is the unique and new wrap from 3M.  Called “Shadow Black” this wrap has a slight texture to it that depicts patterns sort of like camouflage.  

Mazdaspeed Vinyl Wrap

We used this on the roof and in a narrow strip over the seam between Satin Black and Blue Gloss; it really added a unique aspect to the look and style and brought the two colors together.  Pictures just do not give it justice nor can you feel the texture.  

Halfmilespeed3 build
Halfmilespeed3 build

So let’s wrap this up (see what I did there?) with some finished images.  

Halfmilespeed3 build
Halfmilespeed3 build
Halfmilespeed3 build

I have to admit I’ve fallen in love with my car again.  The exterior of my car was pretty beat up and neglected with rock chips, scuffs, and just generally not well taken care of paint.  With the new wrap there is a whole new rush of pride and enthusiasm to keep it looking amazing. 

Lastly, and this is bit cheesy, I requested Saul to match my helmet to the car…

Halfmilespeed3 build

Why not right?  It’s not just another black helmet and I love it.  

With that I hope you enjoyed this sneak peek into wrapping a Mazdaspeed.  Stay connected as we share more and more about the @halfmilespeed3 build…engine, seats, roll-cage, and power!  At some point this season an event will open and we can actually race!

-Barett @ CS

Mazdaspeed Roll Cage Painting, a Necessary Evil

Safety first right?  As much as I want to survive an unfortunate incident while racing my 650+whp Mazdaspeed3…I have a bone to pick with safety.  Sometimes it’s a real pain in the A**.  

Let me explain…and hopefully help you learn from my experience. 

Mazdaspeed3 Drag Racing

Today we are talking about how to paint a roll cage, specifically one that has been custom built to fit tightly inside the cab of a GEN1 Mazdaspeed 3.  How does this relate to safety?  Well…a cage is made from raw steel in “mild” or “chromoly” materials.  Both of these metals will corrode/rust over time. Not only will this result in a very ugly cage inside your car, but it could eventually affect the structural integrity of the roll cage, and that would defeat the whole purpose of it.  

With that I decided to paint the roll cage in my Mazdaspeed 3.  I daily drive and race the car AND I live in the PNW which has lots of rain and moisture.  In fact, in the couple weeks that I did drive the car with the raw cage, I was already getting surface rust build up…gross. 

Mazdaspeed Roll Cage Prep

To add to the difficulty, the cage in my Mazdaspeed was custom built from scratch vs a kit so it was very tight fitting and I have extra “X-bracing” added for increased roll over protection.  This just added to the amount of surface area to paint and the number of locations with bars very close to each other.   

The roll cage/hoop in my #halfmilespeed3 is technically a 8-point cage with an added X-brace in the main hoop and between the rear strut braces.  The X-bracing is what helps with high speed roll over protection, but with a weight penalty.  Go look at any modern rally car and you’ll see X-bracing plus lots more. 

Mazdaspeed Roll Cage Prep

Ok, time to get our hands dirty.  Here are the major items you will need to paint your cage:

  1. Paint – I used a rust-oleum paint & Primer Combo.  Make sure it works with a metal surface.  2-3 cans will be needed to complete the job and I’d suggest a high gloss enamel finish.  It will be much easier to clean.
  2. Safety Equipment – Goggles, Face Mask (a real one with a rating for fine dust), Bunny Suit (because you will get paint ALL over you), Gloves
  3. Scotch Brite Pads – You will need this so you can remove any rust build up (assuming it is minor, if you have a heavily rusting and rough cage then you will need to get far more aggressive)
  4. Cleaner and Rags – Gotta clean the cage after the scotch brite process
  5. Plastic Wrap – This is like industrial size cling wrap.  Easily found at Home Depot or other hardware shops in the painting isle.
     
  6. Blue Tape – A few rolls of the 1.5” will do. 

Step 1: Remove everything you can from the interior (which may not actually be much if you have a cage.  Take your seats out, carpet (what’s left), center console, …etc

When I had the cage installed I decided I wanted to keep the front two seats as factory as possible.  With that I have kept my carpet, center console, dash, door cards, roof upholstery…other than the door bars from the cage, you would have no idea the car has a cage when sitting in the front seats. 

Step 2: Scotch Brite Time!  Grab a pad and start giving your cage a nice rub down. You need to go over all surfaces of the cage if you want good adhesion of the paint to the metal surface.  Once done, do a quick check and I bet you find some missed spots.  Get those also…

Step 3: Clean up time! Grab some clean rags and a cleaner that does not leave any residue.  Clean all the cage surfaces to remove any dust and/or oil.  This is equally as important for good paint adhesion.   

Mazdaspeed Roll Cage Prep

Step 4: Time to seal up the car.  My number one advice here is avoid wind if possible.  This plastic sheet loves to blow away in the wind…it can be very frustrating.  If you have a friend that can help, that would be a great idea. 

You basically want to cover all exposed surfaces inside the car and a lot of the outside of the car.  While you are spray painting, you will be creating a lot of overspray mist floating in the air.  This will settle on all surfaces inside and out.  

I completely wrapped my doors and door edges, inside and outside of the car a bit. 

Mazdaspeed Roll Cage Prep

I completely covered my dash and shifter assembly. 

Mazdaspeed Roll Cage Prep

For the roof upholstery I did not use the plastic wrap, I actually used a piece of cardboard to act like a shield.  I held the cardboard with one hand, shielding the roof while I sprayed the upper sections of the cage.  It was effective and much easier than plastic wrap for that area.  

Step 5: Time to actually paint.  First you need to get into your bunny suit, get your gloves on, your face mask and goggles.  Be proud of how ridiculous you look!

Before you start spraying, make sure you are in a well ventilated area and do not have any other cars or items in close proximity; they will get paint on them. 

Actually Painting: I would advise starting with the hard to reach arrears first.  You are essentially painting inside a jungle gym so get to the hard to reach areas first so you don’t have to worry about touching wet paint later.  I started in the center and top of the cage because I had to be in the car to do so.  Then was able to get to the more outer parts of the cage while outside of the cage.  

Applying the paint is a bit of an art.  You want to apply smooth and consistent layers.  Your hand is always moving side to side as you spray.  Don’t point and shoot or you will get runs in the paint. 

Do a first coat that mostly covers all the surface area, then let it tach up for about an hour or reference the instructions on the can.  Then apply another coat of paint.  Trust me you will find thin or missed spots.  

Mazdaspeed Roll Cage Prep

Step 6: Get out of the bunny suit.  Hahaha ya this can be a process

Anyways, I pushed my car back into the garage and let the paint cure overnight before removing the plastic wrap.  I didn’t want to risk the plastic wrap touching/sticking to the fresh paint.  You may not have that luxury and if you don’t I would at least give the paint a couple hours to cure before removing the plastic. 

Other takeaways – this was an ALL DAY PROJECT.  I thought I could get it done in half a day, but with the concerns about keeping the still installed interior looking good, I was extra cautious with the plastic wrap which added time.  I also did not want to do this again later so I was extra detailed with the painting process.  Checking for missed spots and thin areas after each coat.  

However, the result was well worth the work and I have no regrets about painting the cage.  I can now drive my car without worry of the cage getting ugly or losing strength due to corrosion.  I highly recommend that you take the day or so to make this happen in your car.  

CorkSport Shift S3ctor

I hope you enjoyed this blog and thank you for following along with the @halfmilespeed3. Stay connected (instagram, blog & “Built With Barett” video series) as we share more and more about the @halfmilespeed3 build…engine, seats, roll-cage, and power!  Rolling into the Shift Sector 2021 season we will have more great content to share!

-Barett @ CS