Mazda Shows Us Some Forced Induction Fun

A recently submitted patent popped up from Mazda, which gives all of us boost lovers a serious case of envy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A recently submitted patent popped up from Mazda, which gives all of us boost lovers a serious case of envy; a motor with 2 turbochargers and a supercharger. Text from the patent reads, “The supercharging device according to the embodiment schematic includes first and second exhaust turbochargers 11 and 15 to be driven by exhaust energy of the engine 1, an electric supercharger 18 to be driven by electrical energy, and intercooler 16 which cools intake air discharged from the first and second exhaust turbochargers 11 and 15 and from the electric supercharger 18, and an intake manifold 10 which communicates between the downstream end of the intercooler 16 in the intake air flow direction and the intake ports 3 of the engine 1.”

A recently submitted patent popped up from Mazda, which gives all of us boost lovers a serious case of envy.

This sounds like a party to me and looking at the pictures and further in the text, this motor is designed to be in a rear wheel drive car. Currently the only rear wheel drive model Mazda offers is the Mx5/Miata. Could we be seeing a future Mazdaspeed hotrod in the making?

A recently submitted patent popped up from Mazda, which gives all of us boost lovers a serious case of envy.

Knowing that the Mazdaspeed name is dead, if this new motor comes to life, it would be under the Skyactiv X name and could explain where the future of the Mazdaspeed name was headed. Mazda says “driving matters” and with the boundaries they are pushing with the internal combustion engine in development, this could be another forward-looking motor to make the retired Mazdaspeed name proud.

Beginner’s Dictionary to Mazda Mods

Mazda driving down a road.
Always street tune with a buddy for safety. (PC: renson_ms3)

Everyone was a beginner at some point. Whether you’re new to Mazda modding or you’ve been doing it since you first got behind the wheel, you’re bound to run into some terminology that goes over your head.

At Corksport, our customers are family, and we love learning from and educating our family when it comes to Mazdas. The more you know about your Mazda, the better it can be. This terminology cheat sheet of Mazda language will help you talk the talk as you work to reach your modding goals.

Mazda terminology you need to talk the talk

Axle Back Exhaust: An axle back exhaust starts from the area of the rear axle and extends to the rear bumper. An axle back exhaust replaces the muffler, tips, and a portion of piping that connects to the mid pipes. It has the least effect on performance and fuel economy of all exhaust mods.

Built Block: A built block is a term used when the engine internals are upgraded with higher performance variants over OEM. In most common cases a built block is referred when both the connecting rods and pistons have been upgraded for more strength.

Camber Kit: A camber kit usually consists of a rear camber arm and front camber plates. In addition to correcting wheel alignment on lowered vehicles, a camber kit provides camber adjustment for tracked vehicles which require a slightly negative camber. Correcting the camber is important for even tire wear and maximum traction.

Cat Back Exhaust: A cat back exhaust begins at the end of your catalytic converter and goes all the way back to your rear bumper. It is made up of a rear-pipe, resonator, and muffler. A cat back exhaust system can provide more power, increase fuel efficiency, and deliver distinct sound.

CorkSport cat back exhaust.
Mazda MX-5 with cat back exhaust. (PC: jdm.chris)

Cold Air Intake: A cold air intake essentially lets your engine breathe. Cold air intakes move the air filter outside of the engine compartment so cooler air can be sucked into the engine for combustion. Cooler air brings more oxygen into the combustion chamber and that means more power.

Dyno Tune: Dyno tuning is a systematic approach to engine tuning, allowing a high-quality precise tune-up. During a dyno tune, the vehicle is stationary in a controlled environment.

Front Mount Intercooler: A front mount intercooler cools the charge air from a turbo or supercharged car. Mounted on the front of a vehicle, this intercooler results in better airflow and a higher cooling efficiency. Hot air enters one side and cool air exits the other.

Front mount intercooler on Mazda.
Kyle Sousa’s Mazdaspeed3 with a front mount intercooler. (PC: Kyle Sousa)

Lowering Springs: Lowering springs improve the appearance and handling of a vehicle. By lowering the center of gravity on the car and winding the coils closer together, a lowering spring can make the car feel more connected to the road for better cornering. Lowering springs will also give a more aggressive-looking stance and reduce the vehicle’s fenderwell gap.

Mod: Mod is short for modification. Mods are usually performed to enhance the performance and appearance of a vehicle.

NATOR: NATOR is a group of Mazda enthusiasts who come together to share knowledge about their beloved cars. As the story goes, it all began when a few guys got together to work on their Mazdas while enjoying Wendy’s Baconators. BacoNATOR. We can’t make this stuff up.

Join a NATOR near you.
NATOR group doing their thing.

OEM: Original equipment manufacturer.

Oversteer: Oversteer happens when the rear tires reach their limit before the front tires while cornering, leading to the tail opening up.

Powertrain Control Module: A powertrain control module, commonly called a PCM, is the onboard computer of a car. Essentially the brains of the engine control system, it controls many components of a vehicle and is used for diagnostics.

Short Ram Intake: A short ram intake, also referred to as an SRI, is a mod for internal combustion engines. It consists of a short metal or silicone pipe and a conical air filter inside the engine bay. A short ram intake increases power by eliminating the resonator and filter box, giving the air a shorter travel distance.

Short Shifter: A short shifter changes the geometry of the shifter so the distance of the shift lever is reduced. It moves the pivot point higher up the shift rod causing you to move the shifter less distance, with a shorter throw, transforming the driving experience.

Street Tune: Just as it sounds, a street tune or road tune happens on the street. It should be done to maintain the driveability of the system after the top end has been addressed on the dyno.

Sway Bars: A sway bar, also called a roll bar, anti-sway bar, or stabilizer bar, is a part of the suspension that helps reduce the body roll of a vehicle during fast cornering or when driving over uneven road. It connects opposite wheels together through short lever arms linked by a torsion spring.

Understeer: Understeer is when traction is lost at the front wheels while cornering, forcing you wide on a bend despite applying the correct steering angle. If your car is understeering, your speed is not at its maximum and you’re missing the line.

Want to add to our lingo list? Hit us up on Facebook or Instagram and let’s hear it!

How to Series: Clean Your Intake Valves and Why

If you have a Mazdaspeed, then you have probably heard about cleaning your valves a time or two

If you have a Mazdaspeed, then you have probably heard about cleaning your valves a time or two. You may be asking yourself, why is it that I need to do this? What is it good for? Or why do my valves get dirty in the first place? I’ll be covering all of that in this blog post today, along with full instructions on how to perform the job.

Why do my valves get dirty?

  • They get dirty because our engines are Direct Injected. This means that the fuel is injected directly into the combustion chamber, rather than in the ports. This also means that there is no fuel passing over your intake valves, and those nice detergents in the gas that are advertised don’t do anything for you.
An example of direct injection.
An example of direct injection.
  • That being said, Carbon from the EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) system and oil from the PCV (Positive Crankcase Ventilation) have free reign to cake your valves.

An example of a dirty valve after approx. 80k Miles with no EGR delete or OCC.

  • Figure above is an example of a dirty valve after approx. 80k Miles with no EGR delete or OCC.

Why do I need to do it?

  • If enough time passes without any preventative treatment, the valves eventually can get so caked with carbon, that it can start interfering with proper air flow, combustion, and even the valve’s ability to shut all the way. Intermittent misfires, knock, poor fuel economy, and loss of HP are all symptoms that can occur.

What products do I need?

  • I’m glad you finally asked that! Go ahead and get ready to start jotting down some notes on the things you will need! Most of these can be found locally. *You will need a Shop-Vac, and an Air Compressor.

1. Media Blaster –  This is just a gravity fed gun with a hopper. Powered by compressed air. As you squeeze the trigger, the media falls in and goes out the blaster. You can open and shut the media valve in order to Switch between media and air only.

Price: $19.99

Link: Purchase the Media Blaster

Media Blaster

2. Media – You will want to pick up some of the 24 Grit Walnut. Do not get the 12 Grit as this is too large, and you will continue to jam up your gun where the media falls from the hopper into the barrel. The 24 will have “Fine” In the top right corner.

Price: $22.99

Link: Purchase Walnut Media

You will want to pick up some of the 24 Grit Walnut.

3. Long Picks – You won’t want to start blasting right off the bat. You will want to soak the valves for a little bit and get in there with some long picks to really start softening up that initial built layer. You order the picks online and these are a lot easier to use than the little scribes at Harbor Freight which have always felt too short to me.

Price: $16.71

Link: Purchase Long Picks 

You won’t want to start blasting right off the bat.

4. Carb Clean – Over the years of people testing different
chemicals. The one still in the lead is B-12 Chemtool. You’ll use
this to soak the valves and let it soften up the carbon.  Be sure you get the sprayable can.

Price: $4.49 @ AutoZone.

Link: Purchase B-12 Chemtool

5. Miscellaneous Items

*You must also have all the normal tools required to remove your intake manifold.

  • Blue painters tape
  • Big garbage bag or plastic tarp
  • Long hose to attach to the end of the blaster to be routed through the Shop Vac
  • Funnel
  • Tooth brush
  • Brake clean
  • Shop towels

The process!

1. Disassembly: The goal here is to get your Intake manifold off. This consists of removing the TMIC, (If you have it) your harness, and vacuum lines. A well written write-up on MSF to remove your intake manifold can be found here if you have not yet done this!

2. Mask off the Engine Bay:  In order to prevent walnut from getting everywhere, a proper prep job is very important. Clean the face of the head, and around the runners well. They will be oily and blue tape will not stick well, unless it’s clean! Cut two trash bags so that they lay flat, and stick the tape to them. End result should like this! *Note that cylinder #2 is open and has been taped off.

In order to prevent walnut from getting everywhere, a proper prep job is very important.

3. Soak Your Valves: This is where the process actually starts! Spray down the valve with the B-12 Chemtool until all the build-up is covered. Let It sit for about 30-40 minutes. It may seem like a bit of time, but it does really help to make the process much easier.

4. Start Scraping: This is where your long picks will start to come in handy. With the carb clean still soaking on the valve, use the slightly angled pick to begin the process of removing the buildup. Once you think you have scraped enough off, use the air gun and the Shop-Vac to remove the fluid. Route the hose from the blaster through the vacuum hose as so: The air will blow out whatever is in there, and the vacuum  will cleanly evacuate it from the runner.

This is where your long picks will start to come in handy.

5. Start Blasting: Fill up the blaster with a little funnel. Try to keep it over the box because this stuff likes to go everywhere. Once you have it filled you can proceed to the blasting. Start on the first runner of your choice. Make sure that the hose from the blaster sticks out enough to go a decent distance into the runner. Open the valve on the blaster with the switch on the side, and pull the trigger. Pulse it every couple seconds, as this allows time for the walnut to drain out, and gives your compressor time to keep up! 

Fill up the blaster with a little funnel.

As you blast it, the compressed air forces it into the runner and then gets blown back into the suction of the vacuum. You will need to go back and forth between blasting and picking, as you run into stubborn bits that are giving you a hard time.  You will need to go back and forth between blasting and picking, as you run into stubborn bits that are giving you a hard time.

Fill up the blaster with a little funnel.

6. Rinse and Scrub the Runners: Now you use the brake clean and a toothbrush. The runners by now will be coated in dust and some residue. Use the straw on the brake clean and thoroughly hit the runners. Use an old toothbrush or equivalent to scrub it. You may need to repeat this a couple times in order to get it nice and clean. Suck out the fluid with the Shop-Vac and air gun like you did in step #4. Your final result will definitely blow your mind! *Take extra time to ensure that you have no media left in the runners. Blow it out thoroughly.

Now you use the brake clean and a toothbrush.

7. Repeat for the valve that was taped off: Now that you have completed the ones that were shut, you need to tape those off, and unmask the runner that has the valves open. The easiest way to do this is to rotate the engine by hand. The Crank Pulley is a 21mm Bolt. Simply turn the engine to the right a little bit until the valves fully shut. Having a spotter tell you “when” is the easiest way. If the Buildup makes it hard to tell, then you can put a long screwdriver, or extension in the spark plug hole and watch it reach its peak at TDC. This will ensure the valves are fully shut. Soak the valve, scrape and blast, just like the previous valve.

Now that you have completed the ones that were shut, you need to tape those off, and unmask the runner that has the valves open.

8. Time to clean up: Remove your masking, and try to channel all the walnut into one area. Wad it all up and toss it. Keep the tape on the cylinder head until you are ready install the manifold. Used some compressed air to clean off anything that may have gotten media where it doesn’t belong. Reassemble, and start it up! Check for vacuum leaks or loose clamps. Watch your fuel trims and AFRs on your AP (if you have one) to make sure everything is normal.

Hope this will help you guys on your valve cleaning ventures, and you can always give us a call at 360-260-2675 if you get stuck!


Till next time,

Brett @ CS

Mid-Season Racing Recap

A mid-season recap of the SCCA Western Conference races in the CorkSport Mazda 3.

Technically this is not a mid-season recap, it is more of a three-fourths of a season recap as all of the 6 SCCA Western Conference races are over and I won the conference in the CorkSport Mazda 3.

Autoclub Speedway, Fontana, California: This is the first time we had the Mazda 3 out on a roval and wow it was fast. The only car, which won for top speed, was an Acura RSX type S, which was at the event. I picked up a 3rd place in race one and a DNF in race two, as we had a technical problem with the car. It wasn’t critical but it could have torn up the car, so we stopped after five laps, which put me in 12th place.

Willow Springs, Willow, Springs California: I have never been to Willow Springs and struggled with the car to get a good pace. In race one, I played it safe to keep the car in one piece and finished 9th out of the 13 total cars. In race two, I was much quicker and fought my way up to 5th place. There was lots of traded paint in this race, which put a few cars out of the event.

In race one, I played it safe to keep the car in one piece and finished 9th out of the 13 total cars.

Thunder Hill, Willows, California: I like Thunderhill. I had not driven the Mazda 3 there before, but I have driven the B-Spec Mazda 2 I raced in prior years, and one of Mazda’s TD Mazda 6 which were used in the 25 hours of Thunderhill. In race one, I started at the back of the field due to a timing and scoring issue from the SCCA mixing up my car number, so I got no qualifying time. I was able to get to 3rd place in race one, which wasn’t too bad. I knew I was giving up some time on the track in a few spots after reviewing data, which set me up for race two. Race two went better as I got to fight it out with a NC Mx5 driven by a local driver. Twelve laps in, the Mazda 3 decided it didn’t like me using the brakes as the pads and went bye, bye. This meant I got to drive at 10/10s chasing an Mx5 with no brakes, just lots of metal on metal. When the brakes went, I lost 2nd place so I was playing catch up and throwing the car into corners to slow down. I was able to pressure the Mx5 and he went really wide in a flat out corner, which caused some damage to his car. He pulled into the pits and I was able to take it down a notch and finish in 2nd.

For race one, I qualified 4th out 10 cars which put me on the second row.

Button Willow Raceway, Button Willow: I have raced Button Willow a lot given our location in Vancouver, Washington, and Button Willow being 14 hours south of CorkSport. For race one, I qualified 4th out 10 cars which put me on the second row. The race was uneventful and I was able to keep 4th while holding off the same MX5 driver from Thunderhill. In race two, I got a little crazy at the start with the Acura Rsx from Autoclub and pictured above running the Mx5 off the track during the first lap. Check out my video!

Portland International Raceway, Portland, Oregon: This is my home track as it is all of 10 minutes from CorkSport. This was a pretty quiet race weekend as I qualified second and finished second in both races. I had nothing for the mustang who finished 1st in both races.

The Ridge Motorsport Park, Shelton, WA: I love the ridge, it is a great and challenging track.  We had some mixed conditions where it started raining during race one, so I got to practice car control on race slicks. End result was 1st place. The 2nd race was uneventful and I finished off the weekend with another 1st place.

So this leaves us with one more race for all the marbles at the SCCA runoffs at the end of September at Indy Motor Speedway. Yes, I really get to race at Indy and this is a serious bucket list for any road racer out there. We will be posting a link to watch the race live to see how the Mazda 3 and driver does against 40 other Touring 4 racers. Let’s hope this goes better than last year’s runoffs. I would really like to thank the support for racing the Mazda 3.  All of the parts we use on the track are supplied from CorkSport, the intake, exhaust, swaybar, camber arms, you name it. We are racing what we sell. Big thank you to BFGoodrich Tires for rubber and making sure we have the best tires to race on. This year, BFGracing came through with support for us with tires for the runoffs. Lastly, thank you to Mazda for the awesome car platform and Mazda Motorsports for the tech support with racing a car no one else in the US is running.

Get the Right Lights and Set the Mood

 With our CorkSport LED light kits you no longer have to worry about missed opportunities due to insufficient lighting.

Are you tired of going on dates, leaning in for the kiss, and missing the target because of dull yellow lights? Well search no more, CorkSport family. With our CorkSport LED light kits you no longer have to worry about missed opportunities due to insufficient lighting. CorkSport has been in the Mazda game for quite some time now, and we know that having a ride that shines bright is a must of any Mazda owner. Not only does our LED light kit brighten up your ride, but the lights last longer, and also use less power, just in case you leave one on during the night. Here are the vehicles we offer these kits for:

If you do not know the benefits of the LED light kits, then let me make sure and call that out as well:

  • Blue-White Color
  • Retains Interior Dimming
  • Longer Lifespan
  • Less Heat
  • Resists Shock and Vibration
  • Lower Power Draw

 Not only do you get a bright and shiny ride, but you no longer have to worry about missing that first kiss on the most important date.

These are the reasons why everyone needs the CorkSport LED light kits installed in their Mazda’s. Not only do you get a bright and shiny ride, but you no longer have to worry about missing that first kiss on the most important date. For any questions about them, please call us at 360-260-2675. Happy summer, CorkSport Family ☺

Cheers,

Luke