SkyActiv 2.5T Cold Side Boost Tube Part 2: Testing

In case you missed it, we have been working on improving the flimsy rubber tube that comes stock on the cold side of your 2018+ Mazda 6 2.5T. Check out the first part on the cold side boost tube here and the full OEM piping & intercooler breakdown here. Since our last installment, we have been busy testing a prototype CorkSport Boost Tube and would like to share some results with you all.

Testing Results

SkyActiv 2.5T Boost Tube
CorkSport SkyActiv 2.5T Boost Tube

Starting off we tested and data logged both the OEM tube and CorkSport Performance Boost Tube on the dyno. We were not expecting to see too much of a difference to power with just the boost tube changing however, we did see tiny improvements here and there, most notably way up at the top of the RPM range.

Check out the graph below, (OEM: red, CS: green). We tested on the same day in identical conditions and the car had a CorkSport Intake and Cat Back Exhaust installed for both tests.

PLEASE NOTE: the variations below 2800RPM are due to inconsistencies associated with dyno testing an automatic car.

SkyActiv 2.5T Boost Tube Performance Dyno

After noticing these changes, we went to the data logs to see how the boost changed between the OEM tube and the CS Boost Tube. The graph below shows the engine RPM versus the manifold pressure in psi. Both lines have the same smoothing done to the raw data. As you can see, the CorkSport tube (green) holds about 0.5psi through the midrange (3500-5000RPM) and is almost 1psi more when above 5500RPM. This correlates well with what we saw while dyno testing.

SkyActiv 2.5T Boost Tube Manifold Pressure Test

Testing the Changes

The small increase in boost pressure is likely due to the CorkSport tube not expanding as much when under pressure. To confirm this, we capped off both ends and pressurized the each tube to 20psi. Note: do not try this at home as the caps can easily fly off and injure you.

Boost Tube being tested

After measuring multiple locations both before and during pressurization, we found that the OEM tube expands about 12% in internal cross-sectional area while the CorkSport Boost Tube expands 3x less at 4%. Keep in mind that this would be an even larger difference if the same test was performed with the tubes installed on the car due to the heat of the engine bay. Since silicone is more stable than rubber at high temperatures, the heat of the engine bay will not soften it nearly as much as the rubber OEM boost tube. A softer rubber tube would mean even more expansion when pressurized and even more inconsistent boost pressures.

CorkSport and OEM Boost Tube Comparison
CorkSport Boost Tube (left) & OEM Boost Tube (right)

This data may not show drastic changes but it does not tell the whole story. The larger diameter and thus larger volume of boosted air of the CS tube provides a little bit better response when low in the RPM range. While this may just be a placebo effect on our end, there’s not too much of a wait before you can try it yourself! Stay tuned for more information. If you want a more serious upgrade though, keep your eyes out for information on the upcoming CorkSport FMIC kit and Piping Upgrade kit!

P.S. 2016+ Mazda CX-9 owners and future Mazda CX-5 2.5T owners, don’t worry we will be checking this for fitment along with other CS goodies!

-Daniel @ CorkSport

MZR DISI Injector Seals – The Correct Seal for YOUR Speed

Many years ago we helped bring a revolutionary design to the Mazdaspeed community.  Fast forward 4+ years and you’ll find that the CorkSport Tokay Injector Seals are still the best option for your Mazdaspeed.  

Recently, we had a customer ship their stock block engine core to us for a fresh Dankai 2 Built Block.  During the engine core tear-down and inspection, we found a set of CorkSport Injector Seals installed.  We realized this was a great opportunity to share what we found with the community.

When the CorkSport Injector Seals arrive at your door they look like this:

Brand new a fresh of the lathe with all of their beryllium copper brilliance.  After many thousands of miles of use and abuse they look like this:

Now to the untrained eye you may think they look bad, but the truth is they look fantastic!  The visible top of the seal has a small amount of carbon deposits present. This is to be expected because this surface is exposed to the combustion chamber.  Moving to the side of the seal you can see a distinct clean edge and no carbon deposits on the sides of the seal. This distinct clean edge is where the exterior of the seal is designed to seal in the cylinder head.  This is awesome!

Now let’s look at the inside of the used seals:

Again we see carbon deposits, but they are in and only in the expected locations.  Moving up the side of the seal you can see a “shelf” or “step” that is clean. This is the edge that the fuel injector seals against. Beyond that the inside of the seal is clean.

From this inspection we can see that the injector seal was functioning as designed and doing its job effectively.  

So you might be asking…”What is so special about this design?” Well, we wrote a two-part design blog answering that exactly.  We highly suggest spending the 10 minutes to read these.

Injector Seals Design Part 1

Injector Seals Design Part 2

This is exactly why every single CorkSport Dankai Built Long Block includes a set of CS Injector Seals, but if you’re not looking for a built block but still want the assurance of the CS Seals you can check them out right here.  The install of the seal can be a bit tricky sometimes, especially getting dirty injectors out of the cylinder head.  Because of that we’ve developed an injector puller tool that makes the job MUCH easier.  

We hope you enjoyed this quick tech inspection of the injector seals!  Thanks for tuning in with CorkSport Mazda Performance.

-Barett @ CS

The CorkSport EGR Delete Kit is Here!

If you’re looking to help your racing engine stay healthy and clean, read on as we introduce the CorkSport EGR Delete Kit for Mazdaspeed 3, 6, and Mazda CX-7 Turbo.

An exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system is a very common control system that recirculates some exhaust gases back to the intake manifold to help reduce NOx emissions. A properly functioning system has a few other minor benefits however, on the DISI MZR the EGR system primarily gets clogged,  and/or gums up your intake valves, reducing engine health and performance (for more info, check out our blogs on EGR Cleaning and Intake Valve Cleaning).

The CorkSport EGR Delete Kit removes the two primary components in the EGR system: the EGR valve and the EGR tube. This means no more carbon and soot going into your intake valves, and when coupled with a quality Oil Catch Can, much less frequent valve cleaning.

Each CS EGR delete kit comes with everything you need for a good looking, easy install. The EGR valve is replaced with a 3/8” thick, billet aluminum block off plate. The plates are precision machined to closely match the OEM EGR valve flange to keep your install clean. Proper length bolts are supplied with the CS EGR Delete Kit to ensure you won’t damage your OEM or CS High Pressure Fuel Line.

The EGR tube delete consists of two components: a laser cut 18 gauge T304 stainless steel block off plate and a T304 stainless plug. The plate can be used underneath the tube itself for a stealth install or for an even cleaner engine bay, go for the full tube delete and use the plug to block the hole in your OEM intake manifold.

While not a typical performance mod, the EGR delete is a great addition to aid in a racing build’s future mods. To start, the EGR valve block off plate is tapped for the included 1/8”-27 NPT barb fitting. This works great for the OEM turbo’s rubber coolant line, but should you upgrade to a non-water cooled turbo or a stainless coolant line, 1/8” NPT is a very common size that should be able to accommodate almost any type of fitting.

The CorkSport EGR Delete Kit also provides some much needed room around the turbo charger. With the bulky OEM EGR valve removed turbo swaps are easier, plus, certain turbo setups will literally not fit without an EGR delete. Finally, should you decide down the road to upgrade your Intake Manifold, an EGR delete is basically a must as nearly all aftermarket intake manifolds remove the EGR port from the IM.

The CorkSport EGR Delete Kit is a relatively easy way to gain some extra engine protection without breaking the bank. If you just cleaned your valves and want to avoid it doing it for a long time, a CS EGR Delete Kit is a must.

Mazdaspeed 6 FMIC Comeback!

Since so many of you have asked, we are happy to oblige. The MS6 front mount intercooler kit is making a comeback! Before you get too excited though, there’s still a little bit of a wait before it’s actually being released. We wanted to let all of you Mazdaspeed6 owners know that we haven’t forgotten about you and we have taken our time to ensure this kit comes back better than ever before.

MS6 CorkSport FMIC fitment testing front
MS6 CorkSport FMIC fitment testing

As you can see, the 21”x10”x3” core is staying the same but we are improving the kit everywhere else. This means better fitment, more freedom for SRI selection, and the proven piping design philosophy used in the GEN2 Mazdaspeed 3 FMIC kit. While the MS6 was definitely not designed for an FMIC, the redesigned CorkSport kit makes it easy to say goodbye to the heat soak headache that is the stock TMIC.

MS6 CorkSport FMIC fitment testing Side
MS6 CorkSport FMIC fitment testing

We are still putting the finishing touches on the redesign, and obviously, have a few alignment issues to work out with another round of 3D prints. We can’t say for certain when this will be releasing, but the goal is late spring/early summer 2019. That being said, we will be sure to keep you updated as we inch closer to release.

While we’ve got your attention MS6 owners, are there any features that are a must have for you on this kit? Any other MS6 specific products you’d like to see? Let us know down in the comments (and I’m sorry but orange will not be a piping color option ☺).

Lastly, if you’d like to learn more about what to expect from the intercooler itself, check out the original release blog from way back in 2012 HERE.

An Inside Look at the CorkSport EBCS

We recently came across one of the original CorkSport EBCS prototypes which gave us a perfect opportunity to break it down and give you all an in-depth look. Read on as I go through what makes the CS EBCS tick, and more importantly how it gives you great boost control on your Mazdaspeed.

Just as a refresher before we dive in, an electronic boost control solenoid (EBCS) allows for precise boost control by using an electric solenoid to help control the wastegate. A boost reference travels to the EBCS where it can either push on the wastegate diaphragm or vent to the turbo inlet pipe. Where the air travels is controlled by the solenoid.

Obviously, the specifics change slightly depending on a number of factors with the turbocharger setup, but the concepts remain similar. Since the solenoid is electronic, it can be controlled within a tune. This means you are not wholly controlling your maximum boost with the spring in the wastegate and can hit boost targets larger than the “10psi” spring in your wastegate. For more information on boost control and the different EBCS setups, checkout Barett’s white paper on the subject.

Now the above image is a little different from the way you are usually seeing the CS EBCS. Not only is it missing the sweet black anodized finish (early prototype remember?), it needs some assembly before it can function properly. Below lists the components in the system and a short description of what they do. Obviously, we are missing a few key o-rings to keep everything nice and sealed, but all the important bits are there.

  • Manifold: This is the air distribution block. Air/boost comes in one port and leaves through a different port. Where the air goes is determined by the bullet valve.

  • Bullet Valve Assembly: More on this later, but essentially the center rod (piston) moves in and out while the black portion prevents air from reaching one of the manifold ports as needed.

  • Tension Spring: Keeps the bullet valve in the correct position when the system is not energized.

  • Coil Seat: Ensures the copper coil stays in place so the valve can operate properly.

  • Coil/Windings: Creates a magnetic field when energized that moves center rod of bullet valve.

  • Solenoid Body & Wiring: Contains the coil and other components. Also attaches the valve to the manifold.

Each one of the “thirds” of the bullet valve corresponds to one port on the EBCS manifold. They are labeled accordingly above. As EBCS is energized, the piston of the valve is pulled by the magnetic field created by the windings. There is a small amount of movement; only about 12 thousandths of an inch (0.012”) to be exact, which is enough to allow air to either reach the wastegate diaphragm or pass by into the turbo inlet pipe. Again this is simplified as it does not touch on duty cycle-the valve is typically rapidly opening and closing (seriously, check out the white paper).

The bullet valve is advanced technology that offers the utmost in fast responding fluid control. In addition, its profile offers the ability to make a pressure balanced valve and have a manifold that fits just about anywhere. All of this tech means you end up making boost faster, minimizing boost spikes, and keeping boost creep in check. If you want the best in boost control for your Mazdaspeed, be sure to pick up a CorkSport EBCS.