MZR DISI Injector Seals – The Correct Seal for YOUR Speed

Many years ago we helped bring a revolutionary design to the Mazdaspeed community.  Fast forward 4+ years and you’ll find that the CorkSport Tokay Injector Seals are still the best option for your Mazdaspeed.  

Recently, we had a customer ship their stock block engine core to us for a fresh Dankai 2 Built Block.  During the engine core tear-down and inspection, we found a set of CorkSport Injector Seals installed.  We realized this was a great opportunity to share what we found with the community.

When the CorkSport Injector Seals arrive at your door they look like this:

Brand new a fresh of the lathe with all of their beryllium copper brilliance.  After many thousands of miles of use and abuse they look like this:

Now to the untrained eye you may think they look bad, but the truth is they look fantastic!  The visible top of the seal has a small amount of carbon deposits present. This is to be expected because this surface is exposed to the combustion chamber.  Moving to the side of the seal you can see a distinct clean edge and no carbon deposits on the sides of the seal. This distinct clean edge is where the exterior of the seal is designed to seal in the cylinder head.  This is awesome!

Now let’s look at the inside of the used seals:

Again we see carbon deposits, but they are in and only in the expected locations.  Moving up the side of the seal you can see a “shelf” or “step” that is clean. This is the edge that the fuel injector seals against. Beyond that the inside of the seal is clean.

From this inspection we can see that the injector seal was functioning as designed and doing its job effectively.  

So you might be asking…”What is so special about this design?” Well, we wrote a two-part design blog answering that exactly.  We highly suggest spending the 10 minutes to read these.

Injector Seals Design Part 1

Injector Seals Design Part 2

This is exactly why every single CorkSport Dankai Built Long Block includes a set of CS Injector Seals, but if you’re not looking for a built block but still want the assurance of the CS Seals you can check them out right here.  The install of the seal can be a bit tricky sometimes, especially getting dirty injectors out of the cylinder head.  Because of that we’ve developed an injector puller tool that makes the job MUCH easier.  

We hope you enjoyed this quick tech inspection of the injector seals!  Thanks for tuning in with CorkSport Mazda Performance.

-Barett @ CS

The CorkSport EGR Delete Kit is Here!

If you’re looking to help your racing engine stay healthy and clean, read on as we introduce the CorkSport EGR Delete Kit for Mazdaspeed 3, 6, and Mazda CX-7 Turbo.

An exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system is a very common control system that recirculates some exhaust gases back to the intake manifold to help reduce NOx emissions. A properly functioning system has a few other minor benefits however, on the DISI MZR the EGR system primarily gets clogged,  and/or gums up your intake valves, reducing engine health and performance (for more info, check out our blogs on EGR Cleaning and Intake Valve Cleaning).

The CorkSport EGR Delete Kit removes the two primary components in the EGR system: the EGR valve and the EGR tube. This means no more carbon and soot going into your intake valves, and when coupled with a quality Oil Catch Can, much less frequent valve cleaning.

Each CS EGR delete kit comes with everything you need for a good looking, easy install. The EGR valve is replaced with a 3/8” thick, billet aluminum block off plate. The plates are precision machined to closely match the OEM EGR valve flange to keep your install clean. Proper length bolts are supplied with the CS EGR Delete Kit to ensure you won’t damage your OEM or CS High Pressure Fuel Line.

The EGR tube delete consists of two components: a laser cut 18 gauge T304 stainless steel block off plate and a T304 stainless plug. The plate can be used underneath the tube itself for a stealth install or for an even cleaner engine bay, go for the full tube delete and use the plug to block the hole in your OEM intake manifold.

While not a typical performance mod, the EGR delete is a great addition to aid in a racing build’s future mods. To start, the EGR valve block off plate is tapped for the included 1/8”-27 NPT barb fitting. This works great for the OEM turbo’s rubber coolant line, but should you upgrade to a non-water cooled turbo or a stainless coolant line, 1/8” NPT is a very common size that should be able to accommodate almost any type of fitting.

The CorkSport EGR Delete Kit also provides some much needed room around the turbo charger. With the bulky OEM EGR valve removed turbo swaps are easier, plus, certain turbo setups will literally not fit without an EGR delete. Finally, should you decide down the road to upgrade your Intake Manifold, an EGR delete is basically a must as nearly all aftermarket intake manifolds remove the EGR port from the IM.

The CorkSport EGR Delete Kit is a relatively easy way to gain some extra engine protection without breaking the bank. If you just cleaned your valves and want to avoid it doing it for a long time, a CS EGR Delete Kit is a must.

An Inside Look at the CorkSport EBCS

We recently came across one of the original CorkSport EBCS prototypes which gave us a perfect opportunity to break it down and give you all an in-depth look. Read on as I go through what makes the CS EBCS tick, and more importantly how it gives you great boost control on your Mazdaspeed.

Just as a refresher before we dive in, an electronic boost control solenoid (EBCS) allows for precise boost control by using an electric solenoid to help control the wastegate. A boost reference travels to the EBCS where it can either push on the wastegate diaphragm or vent to the turbo inlet pipe. Where the air travels is controlled by the solenoid.

Obviously, the specifics change slightly depending on a number of factors with the turbocharger setup, but the concepts remain similar. Since the solenoid is electronic, it can be controlled within a tune. This means you are not wholly controlling your maximum boost with the spring in the wastegate and can hit boost targets larger than the “10psi” spring in your wastegate. For more information on boost control and the different EBCS setups, checkout Barett’s white paper on the subject.

Now the above image is a little different from the way you are usually seeing the CS EBCS. Not only is it missing the sweet black anodized finish (early prototype remember?), it needs some assembly before it can function properly. Below lists the components in the system and a short description of what they do. Obviously, we are missing a few key o-rings to keep everything nice and sealed, but all the important bits are there.

  • Manifold: This is the air distribution block. Air/boost comes in one port and leaves through a different port. Where the air goes is determined by the bullet valve.

  • Bullet Valve Assembly: More on this later, but essentially the center rod (piston) moves in and out while the black portion prevents air from reaching one of the manifold ports as needed.

  • Tension Spring: Keeps the bullet valve in the correct position when the system is not energized.

  • Coil Seat: Ensures the copper coil stays in place so the valve can operate properly.

  • Coil/Windings: Creates a magnetic field when energized that moves center rod of bullet valve.

  • Solenoid Body & Wiring: Contains the coil and other components. Also attaches the valve to the manifold.

Each one of the “thirds” of the bullet valve corresponds to one port on the EBCS manifold. They are labeled accordingly above. As EBCS is energized, the piston of the valve is pulled by the magnetic field created by the windings. There is a small amount of movement; only about 12 thousandths of an inch (0.012”) to be exact, which is enough to allow air to either reach the wastegate diaphragm or pass by into the turbo inlet pipe. Again this is simplified as it does not touch on duty cycle-the valve is typically rapidly opening and closing (seriously, check out the white paper).

The bullet valve is advanced technology that offers the utmost in fast responding fluid control. In addition, its profile offers the ability to make a pressure balanced valve and have a manifold that fits just about anywhere. All of this tech means you end up making boost faster, minimizing boost spikes, and keeping boost creep in check. If you want the best in boost control for your Mazdaspeed, be sure to pick up a CorkSport EBCS.

2010 MS3 – Best Way to Get 40+ HP

Your Mazda breathes just like you do. Maximizing the intake of air for your Mazdaspeed and freeing up the expulsion of used gasses (exhaust) will help your vehicle breath better, and go faster.

On the intake side of things, you can set yourself up with a Stage II Power Series Short Ram Intake which includes our mandrel bent turbo inlet pipe, custom designed MAF housing, and silicone coupler. This will free-up flow into the stock turbo and allow your Mazdaspeed to breath deeper. The average gains seen here are 10-15 hp.

For exhaling, you want your Mazdaspeed3 to expel all those used gasses as quick as possible. With the CorkSport turbo-back exhaust, you are reducing the back-pressure and allowing your Mazdaspeed to utilize the potential of its turbo. The kit comes with CorkSport’s full 80mm catback dual exhaust, racepipe, and downpipe. This setup will give the average MS3 owner 28-31 hp at the wheels.

Shown below is our 2010 Mazdaspeed 3 with the CorkSport Short Ram Intake & Turbo-back exhaust and stock turbo, compared to the same Mazdaspeed3 completely stock. The before number is 226 hp and came out to 272 with the SRI and Turbo-back exhaust. That is a 46 hp increase to the wheels with two products.


For those of you on more of a budget, may I suggest just the Short Ram Intake and racepipe? For this smaller investment, you can get an increase of wheel hp in upper 20’s to lower 30’s.

Brett’s Build Part 4

“Hey Bro, what flares are those?” A common question asked, not that I blame anyone for their curiosity.

This is a very niche platform in the grand scheme of things. So we don’t really get lots of options when it comes to widebodies or flares etc. Those of us who have been crazy enough to chop into our ¼ panels had to trust what we think will look good, cross our fingers, and just send it. Some of us get lucky, some of us don’t. I wasn’t in it alone though, I had help from a few friends, and some inspiration. So, here’s the story on how I flared my Mazdaspeed 3.

My good friend Brian over at BMSPEC has a well-known Mazda 3, named “Circuit Heart” Which just recently has gone into retirement. He was one of the first to ever put flares on the Gen 2 Mazda 3 body, and for years I said I wanted that look. When He decided to let go of his old Volks, I had the opportunity to take possession. With his direction, I ordered fair lady Z flares from that were originally meant for a 240Z.  

I asked my local Nator Buddy Aaron Maves if he was down to help me chop up my Mazda and lend me a spot in his garage. Ironically enough, he was a stoked to be a part of the project, probably more than me. Once my flares came in, I got them dropped off at the body shop to be paint matched and started hashing out a plan. Since I work all day long, and flares are a rather tedious process this was going to be a strictly after work job and it ended up taking quite some time to get done. But the wait, blood, sweat, and tears were worth it.

Here is a little step by step process we took to get it done. If you are looking to ever do this to your Mazda, it may either motivate you or deter you away.


Step 1. – Test Fitting

This part is very critical, and one of the most difficult. You have to Mock up the flare to be as perfect as possible. Usually, since the flares we try to use on our Mazda’s, they don’t exactly want to line up where we want, and we need to motivate them a bit to do so.  Painters’ tape by itself will not be enough to hold it where you need. The way I got around this is by using 3M Double Sided VHB tape on the back of where the bolts will go, paired with the painter’s tape. Since these flares weren’t made for this Mazdaspeed3,  I started out on my front driver side fender.  Once I got it where I knew I wanted it, I opened up pandora’s box. I drilled my pilot holes into the fender, no going back now. That’s not even the worst part, because now I had to make all 4 corners symmetrical (No pressure or anything).

Matching every corner is not an easy task, and also something that is often messed up. All I can say is triple check everything, and then do it again. We had to find reference points on the Speed3 itself to measure from. The ground below could be slightly inconsistent. Not only because the floor may not be perfectly level, but because the floor jacks may be slightly different as well. Choose about 4 points to measure from so you can get an accurate X/Y axis measurement to link to the other side. You’ll want the fronts to be identical, and the rears to be identical.

 

Step 2 – Rivnuts

 

Now that we have drilled pilot holes in all 4 corners. We opened them up enough to accept the riv-nuts. This will be the threaded inserts that allow you to bolt the flare to the Mazda. We had to open the hole up slowly, stepping up the size of the bit each pass. Doing this prevents the thin metal from fraying and making sharp edges around the hole. You want the riv-nut to sit as flush as possible, so the flare sits close to the body.

In this particular case, I used ¼ – 20 sized bolts, so I opened op the flare with a ¼ hole and bolted the flare on for a final fitment check.

 

Step 3 – Cutting

The most intense part of the process now begins. My buddy Devin Sorter who is a fabricator/welder came through to help with this. He’s very skilled with a cut off wheel, and I knew I could trust him to make some solid cuts that are symmetrical and clean.

With the flares mounted up, we drew the line for the cuts. Remember you not only have to give yourself enough clearance for the bumps on top, but for steering in the front as well. During this process, part of the bumper clip will have to be removed as well. This isn’t a problem though since the flare itself acts as a support and keeps the bumper from sagging, even with the splitter on the front.

 

Step 4 – Sealing the rear ¼ Panels

Since the ¼ panels in the back aren’t just 1 layer like the front, when you cut into them there is now a gap between the layers that are left open. Even though my Mazdaspeed isn’t driven in the rain, it still leaves the car open and vulnerable to getting moisture in there and eventually causing corrosion. To prevent this, you need to stitch weld the panels together and then reseal it. Once the welding was complete, we used silicone to seal it all in and protect it from the elements. We also put some weather stripping on after the fact to prevent any harsh rubbing on the wheel in case the Mazda bottomed out or the tire somehow traveled up high enough.

At this point, the Mazdaspeed3 was done, and I bolted on the flares. The gasket you use between the flare and the body is up to you, there are lots of options out there.


Thanks for checking this out and stay tuned for part 5!


Cheers,
Brett@CS