Brett’s Build Part 3

Well guys, I am back with a part 3. I apologize in advance for the delayed release of the 3rd chapter, but the Mazda was out of commission for a bit getting some stuff reworked! That being said, we can now pick up where we left off in part 2!


As I started to settle into my new stake at CorkSport, I started adding on lots of new goodies. At the beginning of the new year of 2017, I got to throw on our prototype Stage II RMM and get rid of my old one for some testing and feedback. Not only did the vibes decrease substantially, it also held the powertrain better and was helping my wheel hop significantly. So while I was at it, I threw on a Lower Tie Bar to help even further, knowing I had plans in the very near future to make over 400 Whp.


It was now Feb. of 2017 and I knew I was wanting to reach my new power goal by Summer. So, I talked to my tuner, Erik with Drama Tune, and scheduled to fly him up here in March to dyno tune the car. I had every single piece needed to complete the 400+ Whp puzzle.

The last missing piece was fuel. At this point in time, I had two options, Port Injection or Methanol Injection. Given, that I only needed a little more fueling head room freed up I went with methanol for ease, and price. For those that are curious, I purchased the Snow Performance Stage 3 Kit.  

I started installing the kit at the beginning of March 2017. Since I was going to be putting bungs into the FMIC piping, I got the kit powder coated as well.  I installed one small nozzle right off the cold-pipe of the intercooler, and another large nozzle right before the throttle body. I left a couple inches to help the alcohol atomize. The total amount I was spraying between the two nozzles was approximately 1000 CC’s of 100% Meth as we were using it for Fuel.  

So, with the car ready my Tuner flew up and we got my car on the Dyno! Keep in mind my car is a stock bottom end, so I knew I was going to be playing with fire a bit. The general rule of thumb here: If you are on a stock bottom end and want to push the car in this fashion, always have a backup plan ready in case the engine gives out.

By the end of the session, I had 3 maps from Erik:

Pump Gas: 340 Whp

E85 Blend (3 Gallons): 390 Whp

Methanol Injection: 430 Whp. (e85 still in the tank for added knock resistance and cooling)

The torque was kept down as much as possible at 380 Ft-lbs @ 4700 RPM. So, the stock rods definitely were not in danger. Ultimately if the block were to give out in this situation, it would more than likely be the piston rings. The stock Piston Rings do not like high heat or harsh temp changes. So, the best thing you can do pushing 400+ hp on the stock bottom end is to allow time between pulls for everything to re-stabilize. This will ultimately increase the time you have before it ‘Splodes. Because, if we are being honest with ourselves, at that power level, its always a matter of when, not if with the stock block.

 



So, this is how my MS3 has been for the last year or so power wise. Built block will be in the future soon. But on this next part, I’ll dive into some cosmetics details that I’m sure a lot of people wants to know.

*Hint* “Hey Bro what flares are those”

-Brett@CS



Why do you need an OCC ??

For those that don’t know exactly what an OCC is for, here is a quick rundown.

  1. During normal operation of an internal combustion engine, there’s a compressed air and fuel mixture inside the combustion chamber that is ignited and as a result, forces the piston down. A small amount of that ignited mixture leaks past the piston rings and ends up in the crankcase. This leakage is often referred to as “blow-by” (leakage past the piston rings), and is the reason every car has a PCV System in place (Positive crankcase ventilation)

  2. Some of the oil, mist and other products settle along the engine intake and over time form a “gunk.” With newer cars being direct injected nowadays, this becomes an even larger problem when fuel is not passing over the intake valves and keeping them clean.  The OCC collects the PCV vapors and utilizes a baffle to trap the oil, fuel, and water particulates that are suspended in the air.

  3. These liquids will need to be drained periodically (we say with each oil change) of all the ‘junk’. NOTE: Monitoring how fast the can fills up, mirrors as a method of gauging engine heath. More blow by = Quicker Filling OCC.

 

Carl Jacobsen recently reviewed our Mazda3 OCC in an interview, and we’re releasing it here so you can hear it from a satisfied customer, and not just our opinion.

From the start, we have wanted to give our customers the highest quality experience when purchasing the OCC for their Mazda3. The importance of knowing and seeing you have every piece you need to get started is the key to a successful installation.

 

            “ The unboxing is the best part. You know everything is there, even the step by step instructions. (I tried not to use them, but I ended up doing so because they’re spot on all the way down to the bolt sizes).”

All of our installation instructions come with step by step tips and tricks to make things easy along the way. However, if you ever hit a hiccup, just know we’re only a call away!!

 

            “ Installation was a breeze, instructions were spot on, some parts – like the mount are hard to install without help, but nothing you couldn’t do on your own…  ”

As far as the CorkSport Mazda3 Oil Catch Can goes, knowing that all the crankcase vapors are getting filtered out, allows for you to have that peace of mind that your engine is cleaner. Without filling up the space in your engine bay!

 

            “The OCC is hidden, it doesn’t take up space in the engine bay. You’d never know it was there unless you follow the lines. Also, the ease of access to drain it was a highlight! There was more than enough tubing to route the drain plug to the easiest spot, so you can drain it when changing your oil.”

  • Brett White

Join the Mazda Family

Oh man, where to start.

               Day one, was a 6-hour drive from Utah to Boise Idaho. I was supposed to head out with a couple of other Utah guys, but they were not able to make it. I was on my own for 6 and the only thing going through my head was, “I’m on my own, driving to a town I know no one in, I have zero friends and that I’ll probably be the only Mazda 3 there”. I made it my goal to make friends wherever it is I go or else this was going to be a alone and this trip would have been a waste. As I get into town I settled into my Airbnb and decided to hit the town. I only saw one speed that night but I was anxious for the next day to go to the events start.

                

Day two, I went to this pancake house to grab some grub and I was shaking out of excitement. I head over to Keith’s house and see four speeds outside. I immediately knew I was in the right place. I walk up to Keith and welcomes me with open arms and announces I am the only Utah guy to show up this year. I start talking to everyone and get to meet everyone who shows up and I’m having a blast every one welcoming me to Idaho and the first takeover for me.

Keith announces we will be going to horseshoe bend. A canyon drive day one, one I will never forget. It was a beautiful sight the entire time. Brett hanging out of Corey’s  MX-5 MSM taking beautiful shots of everyone’s cars and even a drone in the sky.

Later that day we head off to start our first competition of the weekend, go-karting. Name of the game fastest lap time wins a prize. I can’t remember who it was that won. Then that night was BBQ night and drinks all around. That’s when I got to meet everyone else who had shown up, share a couple of beers and enjoy the CorkSport koozies that were handed out.

 

Day three, I woke up in my car…well because of the night before.

Saturday was a slow and relaxed day of just hanging out in the garage hiding from the rain. While we hanging out in the garage some of the Oregon guys decided to adopt me and I can join them since I was the only Utahan. I also got to talk to Dale and pick his brain about tuning and learned a bunch about speed that I had no knowledge of as well.  Later that night we head off to the raceway and I’m excited to see everyone run and see lap times everyone was laying down. There were a bunch of cool cars and Barett laying down some fast times on street tires.

Day four, the last day.

Everyone meets up to say their goodbyes, have a beer or two, share some last tales. The few people that have left a great memory for me where Keith, Jordan, Anthony, Aaron, Dale, Brett, Corey, and how could I ever forget Brian. As I head back to Utah with everyone on my mind and how my entire weekend went I wanted to turn around and just stay. I had made new Mazda Friends and Family.

Those four days were ones I could never forget.  The feeling of being accepted into a group of people I didn’t know and didn’t necessarily fit in with was one that cannot be explained. It can only be experienced. When I came back to Utah, I couldn’t stop thinking about my vacation in Idaho. How it ended so soon. How it felt like I started a new life for just 4 days. I want next year to come sooner so that I may meet the friends and family I now have in Idaho, Washington, and in Oregon.  Thank all of you again for the wonderful experience.

Oh yeah, by the way, I am making the drive to the CorkSport Dyno Day and Show & Shine on August 25th – Excited to see my new/old friends!

Stopping power for the Mazdaspeed6

With our goals to make more power, we often forget about the opposite requirement so speed…stopping. The CorkSport Big Brake Caliper Kit is a great place to start, however, if you wish you could stop even faster say hello to the CorkSport 13inch Big Brake Kit. Designed for serious stopping power, it includes 13” directional rotors, powder-coated 4-piston calipers, upgraded pads, and everything you need to install it on your Mazdaspeed 6.

Read on for a breakdown of all the components:

2-Piece Rotors

Lots of thought has put into the design of the performance rotors found in the CorkSport 13inch BBK. The upgrade to 13inch diameter rotors provides greater braking torque for an equivalent braking force (like how a longer wrench makes it easier to loosen a tight bolt). The increased diameter combined with a thicker 28mm (vs 25mm for OE) rotor ring provides better cooling as there is a larger mass to reject heat into.

In addition, slots were added to the friction surface to help sweep away any debris, brake dust, or gases that can otherwise affect your braking characteristics. Drilled rotors were not used as holes decrease your total friction area and increase the chance that the rotor will crack. Utilizing a two-piece design, we were able to decrease the overall weight of the rotor via center section produced from billet aluminum; while also helping dissipate heat from the rest of the rotor better. Semi-Floating mounting between the inner and outer sections allows for quieter rotor vs having a full-floating center section.

Lastly, the rotors feature directional internal vanes that promote more efficient airflow through the rotor which further increases the rotors ability to dissipate heat. By using curved vanes instead of the typical straight vanes, the rotor becomes directional and has to be used on a specific side of the vehicle; however, it also provides more efficient cooling. When the rotor turns, the curved vanes draw air through the center of the rotor and out through the edge, providing greater airflow than a straight vane and thus better cooling. There is another bonus to heat dissipation as the curved vanes have a larger surface area that will come in contact with air than an equivalent number of straight vanes.

Forged Calipers

Four-piston performance calipers manufactured from forged aluminum are included with the kit in a choice of powder-coated blue, red, or black.

Although each piston is individually smaller in diameter than the single OE caliper piston, the total surface area is increased so the braking force at a specific brake pressure is increased. Larger piston surface area means larger brake pads can be used as well. You also get more even braking force on each side of the rotor due to the opposed piston design. This encourages even pad wear, even rotor wear, and consistent braking characteristics. The piston diameter and material were chosen for optimum braking endurance and reliability. They are staggered in size, with the pistons on the leading edge being slightly smaller than the trailing edge pistons. This is another protection for even pad wear. Each piston is made completely out of stainless steel for its low conductive heat transfer. What this means is that the pistons themselves will transfer less heat to the brake fluid than an aluminum or steel piston, decreasing the chances of overheated brake fluid.

Performance Pads

Street performance brake pads are included with the kit. The street sports pads bridge the gap between street and trackpads. They are a more aggressive compound than the pads included with the CorkSport Big Brake Caliper Kit but are not a full track pad. They will produce less dust and noise than a track pad but still need to be warmed up for optimum performance. Should you need new pads or want to change to a different pad, you have a bunch of options from G-Lock, Carbotech, EBC, Hawk, and various other manufacturers.

Lines, Brackets, and Hardware

The remainder of the CorkSport 13inch BBK is composed of exactly what you need to properly and safely install the kit on your MS6. Coated stainless steel brake lines are included to remove any risk of a soft brake pedal and ensure the calipers are operating optimally. High strength billet steel brackets properly position the four-piston calipers on the new rotors using the OE bracket locations. All components are locked down using Grade 12.9 hardware with a corrosion resistant coating for lasting durability.

The CorkSport Mazdaspeed 6 and Mazda6 13” Big Brake Kit has everything you need to keep you safe at increased horsepower levels. If you’re looking for more than the stock brakes have to offer, let the CorkSport BBK be a part of your build.

CorkSport and Mazda Events

I absolutely love it when the fantastic humans at Corksport approach me to blog it up for them.  So let’s dive right in, no time to waste.

August is kind of a sad month if you look at a calendar.  No real holidays to speak of, it’s hot and miserable across the entire United States, and with the exception of Vigil of Assumption Day(whatever that is), August is kind of boring.  But, look no further than the CorkSport’s Dyno Day, Show & Shine and Drag Racing on August 25th!!! It’s almost like Christmas in August. Free stuff, raffles, food and drink but most importantly, great people.  Be sure to let them know if you are coming on their EVENT PAGE!

Oh, you forgot who I am.  Well, I put on one of the craziest meets for us Mazda junkies.  Mazda Takeover, yeah, I’m that guy that annoys you on the Facebook groups reminding you to come and have a weekend of a lifetime.  You might be wondering what that has to do with a Corksport Dyno day? I will gladly tell you.

Corksport has gotten behind Mazdaspeed Idaho’s little shindig in a big way.   You see, the good folks over at CS year after year make the trek, a pilgrimage if you will to Idaho for Takeover weekend.  It’s only right that we return the favor! As soon as CorkSport announced their dyno day event, posts from Mazdaspeed Idaho members flooded our local page with questions, ideas, plans and straight up commitment to making the trip to CS in August.

I might be a little biased about the Mazdaspeed Idaho group being the best group of people ever, and they are. The cars in Mazdaspeed Idaho may not be showpiece material, nor are they the fastest on the planet, but us members love our Mazda’s as if they were show cars or all out HP cars.  

Hell, one member sold his Gen 1 speed and within a year picked up a Gen 2 just because he loved the community more than the other community options given his other cars, so that’s saying something about not only the Mazda brand, his local Mazda community, but it says a lot about Corksport as well.  Having owned his new Mazdaspeed 3 less than a week, he was the first to commit to wanting to go with the group that forms to the  CorkSport dyno day! He is beyond excited to meet the people and see the building where his car part dreams come to fruition.

As of right now, I’m guessing Idaho will roll into Vancouver with 10-20 Mazda’s, which is a huge improvement over the 4 we took last year.  I’m really looking forward to this event, mostly because it gives the Western Washington Mazdaspeed and Nator OR communities another group to bond with.  Which is what Mazda should be about, forming and building a strong, unbreakable community that forges lifelong friendships through one shared passion.  I really hope some California members make the trip as well. It’s always refreshing to see other Mazda’s, other ideas, and other builds.

I didn’t ask my boss, I told him I won’t be available because I have race car stuff to do with my race car family.  And you all should tell your boss the exact same thing, and show up for one hell of a weekend out at Corksport.

See you @ CorkSport August 25th!

 

Keith Eggert