The CorkSport EGR Delete Kit is Here!

If you’re looking to help your racing engine stay healthy and clean, read on as we introduce the CorkSport EGR Delete Kit for Mazdaspeed 3, 6, and Mazda CX-7 Turbo.

An exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system is a very common control system that recirculates some exhaust gases back to the intake manifold to help reduce NOx emissions. A properly functioning system has a few other minor benefits however, on the DISI MZR the EGR system primarily gets clogged,  and/or gums up your intake valves, reducing engine health and performance (for more info, check out our blogs on EGR Cleaning and Intake Valve Cleaning).

The CorkSport EGR Delete Kit removes the two primary components in the EGR system: the EGR valve and the EGR tube. This means no more carbon and soot going into your intake valves, and when coupled with a quality Oil Catch Can, much less frequent valve cleaning.

Each CS EGR delete kit comes with everything you need for a good looking, easy install. The EGR valve is replaced with a 3/8” thick, billet aluminum block off plate. The plates are precision machined to closely match the OEM EGR valve flange to keep your install clean. Proper length bolts are supplied with the CS EGR Delete Kit to ensure you won’t damage your OEM or CS High Pressure Fuel Line.

The EGR tube delete consists of two components: a laser cut 18 gauge T304 stainless steel block off plate and a T304 stainless plug. The plate can be used underneath the tube itself for a stealth install or for an even cleaner engine bay, go for the full tube delete and use the plug to block the hole in your OEM intake manifold.

While not a typical performance mod, the EGR delete is a great addition to aid in a racing build’s future mods. To start, the EGR valve block off plate is tapped for the included 1/8”-27 NPT barb fitting. This works great for the OEM turbo’s rubber coolant line, but should you upgrade to a non-water cooled turbo or a stainless coolant line, 1/8” NPT is a very common size that should be able to accommodate almost any type of fitting.

The CorkSport EGR Delete Kit also provides some much needed room around the turbo charger. With the bulky OEM EGR valve removed turbo swaps are easier, plus, certain turbo setups will literally not fit without an EGR delete. Finally, should you decide down the road to upgrade your Intake Manifold, an EGR delete is basically a must as nearly all aftermarket intake manifolds remove the EGR port from the IM.

The CorkSport EGR Delete Kit is a relatively easy way to gain some extra engine protection without breaking the bank. If you just cleaned your valves and want to avoid it doing it for a long time, a CS EGR Delete Kit is a must.

2018+ Mazda 6 2.5T OEM Intercooler & Piping Analysis

We’ve already mentioned briefly that we have an upgraded intercooler kit in the works for the SkyActiv 2.5T, but now it’s officially time to dive in and get into how and why an upgraded intercooler kit is a good fit for your 6. To understand how to make a performance part, we first have to understand what makes the stock parts tick and where we can improve them, which is what we will be covering today!

For those of you that are new to the boosted lifestyle, I feel that I should go over a few terms that will be thrown around frequently later in this blog.

  • Hot Side Piping: Also known as just “hot side” or “hot pipes” this piping section carries the pressurized air (boost!) from the turbocharger to the intercooler. As it is before the intercooler, the air has not been cooled and the “hot” name is quite accurate (think 200-250°F. or even more on a turbo that’s too small). Shown above on the right side.

  • Intercooler: A basic heat exchanger. Air flows through the inside and is cooled by air flowing through the outside while you drive down the road. The same way a radiator works except with air inside instead of coolant. It is made up of three parts the “end tanks” and the “core”. The end tanks are what transfer the air from the piping to the core while the core is the actual heat exchanging portion. Shown front and center in the above image.

  • Cold Side Piping: Also known as just “cold side” or “cold pipes” this piping section carries the pressurized air from the intercooler to the engine. As it is after the intercooler, the air has been cooled to make more power. Shown above on the left side.

 

Now into the details…

The hot side piping must make its way all the way from the rear of the engine to the front of the car. The OEM piping takes a pretty direct route, and is a decent diameter for stock piping, starting & finishing at just under 2” inner diameter. This, however, is where the good things end.

To start, the two rubber sections of the hot side are single ply. These allow for good flexibility on install and to allow for engine movement but will start to expand on higher than stock boost levels, increasing boost lag and decreasing throttle response. In the image above, the main rubber section squishes under the small weight of the upper plastic section of the hot pipe. This isn’t even the main issue with the hot side piping!

The upper plastic section of the hot side has quite a few small radius bends, and a few areas where the pipe reduces in diameter severely, affecting the maximum flow and restricting the power of your 2.5T. Check out the worst area below, it’s tiny!

And what might be causing this reduction in diameter you may ask?

That’s right, its clearance for a hose clamp. Mazda, I’ve got to call you out on this one, couldn’t you have just rotated the clamp, and kept the diameter in the pipe? Anyways, on to the intercooler itself.

The intercooler itself isn’t too bad, a decent sized core with lots of fins to help cool as good as it can. That being said, there’s still plenty of room for improvements. First: make it bigger. The intercooler mounting could’ve been simplified to get more width, and there’s a bunch of room to go thicker. While thick is not the best for heat transfer efficiency, it will still help cool off the air better. Height is already more or less maxed out without cutting up the crash beam, but we should be able to make enough extra volume elsewhere to make a big difference.

Intercoolers are a delicate balancing act between cooling efficiency and pressure drop. Cores that cool extremely well usually have a larger pressure drop (loss of pressure from inlet to outlet) and vice versa. With the high fin density of the OEM intercooler, we can expect a relatively high-pressure drop (2-4psi would be my rough guess) but pretty good cooling. From early dyno testing on the CorkSport Short Ram Intake, the intercooler does a good job cooling but loses power on back to back dyno runs. I expect that this is the intercooler “heat soaking”. Heatsoak is what happens when an intercooler is undersized or is not getting enough airflow, it heats up and is no longer able to cool the boost off, robbing you of power.

The two images above show the real Achilles heel of the OEM intercooler and what is likely causing the heatsoak issues: the end tank design. Since the charge air enters and exits the core at an upward angle, it’s being directed away from the lower runners of the core. There is a sharp angle that would be hard for the air to turn, meaning the bottom three internal runners (shown with the red box) are likely not actually doing much. So you’ve got intercooler taking up space that is likely not doing much… We aim to fix this.

The cold side of the system is actually pretty good-inner diameter of just under 2.25” on the ends (even larger in the middle) and a short path into the throttle body. We’ve already covered the basics of it when discussing the upcoming CorkSport boost tube HERE. Like with the hot side, the rubber connector is prone to expansion under increased boost levels. While the CorkSport silicone boost tube will still be coming on its own, we plan to offer something even stiffer that is optimized for our upgraded FMIC kit.

Much more information to come in following blogs as we’ve been busy working away on this project. Stay tuned for full details on the upcoming CorkSport FMIC kit, and if you’ve got any questions, leave them down below.

-Daniel @ CorkSport

Mazdaspeed 6 FMIC Comeback!

Since so many of you have asked, we are happy to oblige. The MS6 front mount intercooler kit is making a comeback! Before you get too excited though, there’s still a little bit of a wait before it’s actually being released. We wanted to let all of you Mazdaspeed6 owners know that we haven’t forgotten about you and we have taken our time to ensure this kit comes back better than ever before.

As you can see, the 21”x10”x3” core is staying the same but we are improving the kit everywhere else. This means better fitment, more freedom for SRI selection, and the proven piping design philosophy used in the GEN2 Mazdaspeed 3 FMIC kit. While the MS6 was definitely not designed for an FMIC, the redesigned CorkSport kit makes it easy to say goodbye to the heat soak headache that is the stock TMIC.

We are still putting the finishing touches on the redesign, and obviously, have a few alignment issues to work out with another round of 3D prints. We can’t say for certain when this will be releasing, but the goal is late spring/early summer 2019. That being said, we will be sure to keep you updated as we inch closer to release. While we’ve got your attention MS6 owners, are there any features that are a must have for you on this kit? Any other MS6 specific products you’d like to see? Let us know down in the comments (and I’m sorry but orange will not be a piping color option ☺).

Lastly, if you’d like to learn more about what to expect from the intercooler itself, check out the original release blog from way back in 2012 HERE.

Welcome to the Gen3 Mazda 3 Suspension Package

Want to upgrade your suspension system on your Gen3 Mazda3, but don’t want to deal with the headaches that come with lowering springs or coilovers?

Introducing the CorkSport Adjustable Shock/Strut Assembled Package for 2014+ Mazda 3. This truly is a complete package that includes CorkSport lowering springs, CorkSport adjustable shocks/struts, and CorkSport camber plates all assembled and ready to install.

 

 

We’ve discussed before how the CorkSport adjustable shocks and struts are a great compliment to the CorkSport lowering springs. Now we have included them together in a package with our camber plates to give a huge handling and adjustability upgrade to any Gen3.

In addition, this package comes assembled with new OE dust boots, pivot bearings, and bump stops that are even cut to proper length to match the lower ride height. Since this package comes assembled with new parts, installing it is a snap. No spring compressors needed at any point. Check out the image below to see exactly what you get in every box.

 

 

Whether you are looking to replace some worn out OE components and get a style bonus, or are looking for some and handling and adjustability for your racecar, the CorkSport Adjustable Shock/Strut Assembled Package can help you reach your goal.

An Inside Look at the CorkSport EBCS

We recently came across one of the original CorkSport EBCS prototypes which gave us a perfect opportunity to break it down and give you all an in-depth look. Read on as I go through what makes the CS EBCS tick, and more importantly how it gives you great boost control on your Mazdaspeed.

Just as a refresher before we dive in, an electronic boost control solenoid (EBCS) allows for precise boost control by using an electric solenoid to help control the wastegate. A boost reference travels to the EBCS where it can either push on the wastegate diaphragm or vent to the turbo inlet pipe. Where the air travels is controlled by the solenoid.

Obviously, the specifics change slightly depending on a number of factors with the turbocharger setup, but the concepts remain similar. Since the solenoid is electronic, it can be controlled within a tune. This means you are not wholly controlling your maximum boost with the spring in the wastegate and can hit boost targets larger than the “10psi” spring in your wastegate. For more information on boost control and the different EBCS setups, checkout Barett’s white paper on the subject.

Now the above image is a little different from the way you are usually seeing the CS EBCS. Not only is it missing the sweet black anodized finish (early prototype remember?), it needs some assembly before it can function properly. Below lists the components in the system and a short description of what they do. Obviously, we are missing a few key o-rings to keep everything nice and sealed, but all the important bits are there.

  • Manifold: This is the air distribution block. Air/boost comes in one port and leaves through a different port. Where the air goes is determined by the bullet valve.

  • Bullet Valve Assembly: More on this later, but essentially the center rod (piston) moves in and out while the black portion prevents air from reaching one of the manifold ports as needed.

  • Tension Spring: Keeps the bullet valve in the correct position when the system is not energized.

  • Coil Seat: Ensures the copper coil stays in place so the valve can operate properly.

  • Coil/Windings: Creates a magnetic field when energized that moves center rod of bullet valve.

  • Solenoid Body & Wiring: Contains the coil and other components. Also attaches the valve to the manifold.

Each one of the “thirds” of the bullet valve corresponds to one port on the EBCS manifold. They are labeled accordingly above. As EBCS is energized, the piston of the valve is pulled by the magnetic field created by the windings. There is a small amount of movement; only about 12 thousandths of an inch (0.012”) to be exact, which is enough to allow air to either reach the wastegate diaphragm or pass by into the turbo inlet pipe. Again this is simplified as it does not touch on duty cycle-the valve is typically rapidly opening and closing (seriously, check out the white paper).

The bullet valve is advanced technology that offers the utmost in fast responding fluid control. In addition, its profile offers the ability to make a pressure balanced valve and have a manifold that fits just about anywhere. All of this tech means you end up making boost faster, minimizing boost spikes, and keeping boost creep in check. If you want the best in boost control for your Mazdaspeed, be sure to pick up a CorkSport EBCS.