2021-up Mazda 3 Turbo and CX30 Turbo Intake Heat Shield

Cold air vibes for your Mazda 3 turbo

Have you been waiting for the CorkSport Heat Shield to go along with a CS SRI to snag one? Well you don’t have to wait any longer because the CS heat shield is here! Whether you have the CS SRI already or want to get both at the same time, the CorkSport Heat Shield for both the Mazda 3 and CX-30 with the SkyActiv 2.5T is a great mod to include in your build. Keep on reading to see how the CS Heat Shield is able to achieve lower intake air temps that allow your motor to make power easier.

Mazda 3 turbo engine bay intake heat shield

For the Mazda 3 Turbo Heat Shield our main focus was keeping cool air supplied to the filter. The shield was designed to seal off the intake from as much heat produced from the radiator, engine and transmission as possible. This lead to a multiple piece design that is riveted together which allows us to utilize the OEM air ducting which supplies cooler outside air to the filter. The shield does not fully surround the filter because we have also found that there is cool air that also comes from the area in front of the tire and underneath the headlight while driving, helping to ensure that your intake sees as much cool fresh air as possible.

Mazda Cx30 Performance Intake Heat Shield

Now with all of this cooler air being supplied, how does it help performance? The basic concept is that since cold air is denser than warm air, your engine gets more air per cycle, and thus allows more fuel to be added to make more power. However, when a car is turbocharged, the process is a little more complicated. A turbo compresses and heats up your intake air and then sends it to an intercooler that cools the air back down. What that means is that the “colder air will make more power” generalization may not be as significant, especially with the advancements in modern turbocharged vehicles. Colder intake air does offer a benefit in the form of less stress on your turbo system. This means that your turbo does not have to work as hard to flow the same amount of air at the same boost pressure. Also a reduction in intake air temps can translate to slightly cooler air exiting your turbo compressor, which helps take some stress off the intercooler as well.

Mazda 3 turbo cold air intake heat shield installed

With all of the theory covered, let’s get to the real world results! In daily driving testing we found decreased intake air temps with the CorkSport Heatshield installed. When cruising or when it’s cold outside, we were actually surprised at the low intake temps of the CS SRI alone—there’s actually a surprising amount of fresh air that gets into the engine bay. Where the heatshield really comes into its own is when sitting stationary or driving on a very hot day. That’s when we saw our biggest improvements in intake air temp.

3 cold air intake heat shield test data

Lastly about the manufacturing, the CorkSport Heat Shield is made out of carbon steel that is laser cut and precision formed. Carbon steel was selected for its strength and lower heat transfer over aluminum. To fight off corrosion, the heatshield is powder coated wrinkle black and gives the heat shield a great look that helps it blend in with the other parts in the engine bay. Both sections of the shield are attached together using stainless steel rivets for corrosion resistance and a nice look. Lastly, we include rubber seals along the top edge of the CS Heat Shield to keep as much heat out as possible, and to prevent any unwanted vibrations or noise.

Mazda 3 turbo cold air box

If you’re looking to complement your CS SRI with some added heat protection or want to pick them up together, check out the product listing for the CorkSport Heat Shield for additional photos and video! Also, feel free to contact us with any questions you might have.

Cold Air Intake Systems Explained for your Naturally Aspirated & Turbo Mazda

Mazda 6 Turbo Performance Intake

Cold air intake systems, are they necessary? Are they worth the extra cost? Does it matter if the engine is turbocharged or not? Will the engine or its performance be hurt without one? We have repeatedly seen these questions on forums and social media groups regarding Mazda’s 3rd and 4th Generation Mazda 3 & 6. To help the Mazda community grow, learn about their cars, and what to do with them, we have written a blog that we hope will help shed some light on these questions and others. 

Most importantly, you will NOT hurt your engine if you use an SRI only on Turbo or Non-Turbo applications.  

What are the typical intake systems available for your Mazda? At CorkSport, we have two primary intake system setups: Short Ram Intake (SRI) System and Cold Air Intake (CAI) System. It is essential to distinguish between the two because you (the Mazda enthusiasts) will ultimately decide which system to use. 

Short Ram Intake (SRI) System

This CorkSport system consists of a filter, billet MAF housing, silicone coupler, a few clamps, and may or may not have a mounting bracket (depending on application). This system is efficient and straightforward (an unrestricted airflow path increases power). This system removes the factory airbox and snorkel. The cost is very effective for the results and provides excellent induction sounds. 

Mazda 6 Turbo Performance Intake

Cold Air Intake (CAI) System

CorkSport’s system consists of the SRI (as mentioned above) plus a heat shield or airbox designed to keep the engine bay heat away from the intake system’s inlet and helps direct cold air induction. This system removes the factory airbox and may or may not reuse the factory snorkel. The cost will be higher than an SRI due to the additional components involved and may muffle some of the induction noises but provide better heat control.

Mazda performance air intake heat shield

OK, is a Cold Air Intake System worth the extra cost and complexity? Does it do anything? Well, in our opinion, yes and no. We have tested this, and we have proven that a heatshield does improve (read reduce) “heat soak” of the intake system, BUT not in the ways most people expect. Below is some data from our 2018 Mazda 6 Turbo with our SRI and then also with our SRI + Heat Shield:

This first graph shows the vehicle idling for a period of time, much like sitting at a stoplight or in traffic. The red graph shows the SRI only, and the blue chart shows the SRI+Heat Shield. It’s pretty apparent the heat shield is helping reduce the amount of engine bay heat being ingested by the intake while the vehicle is sitting. The maximum temperature delta is approximately 15-20deg F. That’s a respectable improvement, and this lower amount of heat soak should, in theory, improve the vehicle’s acceleration from a complete stop. Now let’s look at a graph that combines idling and acceleration up to 50mph

The second graph indicates similar data for the stationary idling period, but more importantly, is what the data tells us once the vehicle starts moving. You see a small spike for both systems (this is due to the engine suddenly ingesting more air), then you see the air temp drop rapidly as the vehicle increases in speed. The vehicle’s forward motion/speed is important because that is how fresh cool ambient air enters the engine bay.

You’ll notice that both the red and blue graphs meet at the same point after the rapid cooling then have a small amount of fluctuation. In a nutshell, both the SRI and SRI+Heat Shield perform about the same once the vehicle is moving. Again, they perform almost identically once the car is rolling.

Next question, does it matter if the vehicle is turbocharged or not? Before we answer that, let’s go over the differences between turbocharged and non-turbocharged systems. 

Turbocharged

The engine is equipped with a turbocharger and an intercooler system to cool the boosted air temperatures before entering the engine. The intercooler system is required to negate the by-product of turbocharging an engine (and thus boost), which is heat. The airflow path is intake -> turbo -> intercooler -> engine.

In a turbocharged engine, the need for and use of a Cold Air Intake System is typically not deemed necessary or very useful. The turbocharger superheats the cooler air it receives from the intake before passing it to the intercooler. The boosted air exiting the turbo is substantially hotter than the ambient air temperatures in your engine bay before it enters the intake – especially true while the vehicle is moving.    

More focus is placed on performance improvements of the intercooler system because that is the primary method to cool the incoming boosted (read “hot”) airflow before it enters the engine. The use of a cold air intake system has little effect on the resulting boost air temps, so the cost-effectiveness is not great. This is precisely why the Mazdaspeed platform focuses on increasing the intake size (ingesting more air = more power), adding a larger turbo (more boost), and increasing the size of the intercooler (additional surface area for cooling) coupled with a professional tune to maximize power.

Non-Turbocharged

The engine is not equipped with a turbocharger and, therefore, does not require an intercooler system. The airflow path is more direct and does not have a cooling system built-in; intake -> engine.  

Since there is no intercooler to cool the incoming air (it’s not needed), the best way to improve air density and performance is with cooler air entering the engine directly. So, a cold air intake on a non-turbo engine can be helpful – especially in warmer climates. 

2019-Mazda-3-air-intake

Let’s Recap: 

In either turbo or non-turbo applications, a heat shield or CAI system will provide varying degrees of benefit in some driving situations. For a turbo application specifically, the usefulness of the CAI system is marginal due to the turbo heating the air it receives from the intake. Instead, investing in an SRI and performance intercooler system is a much better plan.   

For the non-turbo applications, a CAI system is a worthwhile investment because the airflow path is so much more direct, and it’s the only way to help reduce intake air temps and thus increase air density which equals power.  

We hope this has been a helpful and educational blog and lends support as you decide the right path for you and your Mazda! Thanks for tuning in!

-Barett @ CS

Gen4 Mazda 3 Turbo Performance Lowering Springs

Putting a turbocharged engine in the GEN4 Mazda 3 was a step in the right direction for Mazda but it still misses the mark of a “hot hatch”. Well that’s where we come in! Introducing the CorkSport Lowering Springs for 2021+ Mazda 3 Turbo. We took what we learned from the naturally aspirated 3 and applied it to the slightly heftier turbo models. This resulted in a great new ride height and improved handling to push the GEN4 closer to a hot hatch, without ruining the daily driving comfort. Read on for full details and images of the great new look!

Let’s start off with what everyone wants to know: ride height! With only one driveline & transmission option, we could really dial in the ride height for both turbo hatchback and sedan models. The CS lowering springs for the turbo models offer a similar ride height drop to the N/A models. For the turbo hatchback, this means a ride height drop of approximately 1.5” in the front and 1.8” in the rear. For the slightly heavier turbo sedan, expect a drop of 1.5” in the front and 1.9” in the rear. While the sedan is a slightly larger drop in the rear than the hatchback, it still sits level and looks great!

This ride height is low enough to look great yet not too low to cause you issues on your daily commute. We found that this ride height can clear most driveways and speed bumps no problem. On really steep driveways, taking it slow and at an angle will help you keep your front bumper safe. We haven’t really found a driveway that was an issue though! One final note: we did test our regular, non-turbo Mazda 3 springs on a turbo car. While they fit, the extra weight from the turbo system had the car sitting way too low in the front & looking ugly. We would not recommend doing this!

Moving on to the next best benefit from lowering springs: handling! The CorkSport lowering springs offer some much needed sharpness to the MZ3-T. By lowering the ride height, you lower the center of gravity of the vehicle. Combining this with stiffer than OEM spring rates, body roll is reduced, which greatly helps driver confidence through the twisties. We carefully chose our upgraded spring rates to also help reduce understeer when at the limit of traction. By increasing the rear spring rate more than the front, your turbo 3 gets better turn in and more neutral handling.

The final spring rate numbers for the Mazda 3 2.5T lowering springs actually surprised us. We tested a few different spring rate combinations to find the best balance of ride and handling. Ultimately, the same spring rates as the naturally aspirated Mazda 3 won out (this was due to both cars using the same suspension design). A 3.4K front spring and a 5.9K rear spring offered a compliant ride for daily driving, yet great handling characteristics on a backroad. The OEM dampers on the turbo models are just a hair stiffer as well, so the increase in spring rate fits fantastic with no bouncy ride!

Each set of CorkSport lowering springs for Mazda 3 turbo are made specifically to fit directly in place of the OEM springs. The only small modification that is needed is to trim the bump stops to allow for correct suspension travel before the bump stop is contacted at the new lower ride height. The springs are all made from high tensile strength spring steel. This ensures a consistently performing spring that will stand the test of time and will not settle. We finish off each spring with a powdercoated red finish. We chose red instead of the typical CS blue to help the turbo models stand out and because red things are proven to go faster! We even include a spring silencer on the rear springs to prevent any noises.

That about wraps up the launch of the CorkSport Lowering Springs for Mazda 3 Turbo. Check out the product listing at the link below for more pictures. Be sure to give us a call with any questions you have, we’re happy to help!

P.S. The car in the above images is riding on Advan GT wheels in 19×8.5 +38 size, wrapped in Kumho 235/35 R19 summer tires.

Mazdaspeed 3 Port Injection Fuel Kit

Its 2021, you survived 2020 and finally got those last goodies installed on your Mazdaspeed 3…you’re finally fully bolted.  It’s been about 6 months and now you want more, but your Tuner keeps telling you you are out of fuel. What the Hell does that mean!?

Let me tell what that means and let me show you the solution via the BEST Port Injection Fuel Kit for your Mazdaspeed 3 or MPS 3.  If you know this is the kit for you don’t wait any longer (Link to ALL THE FUEL), but I do invite you to check out the great information below. 

Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Say no to “out of fuel” and say yes to enough fuel to support 750+WHP!  But first let’s take a step back to understand the basics. 

Why is your Mazdaspeed 3 “out of fuel”?

The Mazdaspeed 3 and 6 use early technology for direct injection injectors which sadly do not have an aftermarket replacement and reach their flow capacity limit quickly.  This basically puts a limit on the OEM fuel systems horsepower capacity.  From what we have seen firsthand and in the community; the limit is around 360-390whp depending on the performance parts on the engine and the fuel used.  The only current solution is to add a port injection system with either 2 extra or 4 extra injectors.  We’ll talk more about that. 

Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

What is an auxiliary port injection fuel system? – This is a kit that adds (does not replace) port style fuel injectors to the intake manifold so that you can increase the total fueling capacity of your Mazdaspeed or MPS.  There are a few ways this can be done and all have been done in the Mazdaspeed Community. 

2 extra or 4 extra injectors (aka 6th Port or 8th Port Injection)

While the CorkSport Port Injection Fuel Kit is designed for 4 extra injectors (8th Port Kit); there are options in the community that only use 2 extra injectors (6th Port Kit).   CorkSport believes the 8th Port Injection kit is the superior setup because it has higher capacity, is more reliable and safer for the engine.

With an 8th Port Kit there is an extra injector on each runner of the intake manifold spraying directly into that one and only runner.  With a 6th Port Kit there are two extra injectors spraying directly ahead of the throttle body and then depending on the flow distribution of the intake manifold to disperse the fuel to each runner and thus cylinder.

Return vs Returnless Setups

This is another option for Port Injection Fuel Kits in the community.  While both have their place, the CorkSport 8th Port Fuel Kit uses a “return” style setup because again it has higher capacity, is more reliable and safer for the engine because it is easier to tune for.

In a “return” style setup the fuel pressure for the extra injectors increase as boost pressure increases keeping a consistent fuel flow rate per injector duty cycle which provides the higher capacity and much more consistent tuning.  While the “returnless” style setup just plumbs the extra injectors into the OEM fuel feed to the HPFP.  The fuel pressure does not increase with boost pressure and therefore the capacity is lower, around 500-550WHP.

Integrated vs Standalone Fuel System

Lastly is the consideration of how the Port Injection Injectors are fueled.  This can come from the OEM fuel tank or from a completely separate fuel tank in the vehicle.  Unlike the bullets points above, this is not really a “one is better than the other”, but more of “what suits the needs of your vehicle and uses”. 

Integrated Setup

As the name implies this means the Port Injection Fuel Kit sources its fuel from the OEM tank and in-tank pump.  This can actually be done a couple ways 1) via the “returnless” setup as mentioned above but that has its issues or 2) via a surge tank that is mounted in the engine bay or cabin…which has some concerns.

The surge tank setup is a very common “racecar” setup and for good reason.  It handles high G load corning, acceleration, and braking great and also fuels the entire car, not just the port injection system.  However the cost is usually much higher and requires relocation of other engine bay components so you can mount the surge tank. Along with that you can only use one fuel for the entire system so if your car needs a special high octane fuel then you have to use it at all times during operation, whether cruising or full power.

Standalone Setup

In contrary this is a completely separate fuel source via a separate tank.  This can be a really great option for the enthusiast that does some spirited driving, maybe some events here and there, but also daily drives their Mazdaspeed 3.  How is this the case?

With a completely separate fuel cell for the port injection system you can run the exotic race gas/ethanol in the port injection tank and run normal cheap pump gas in the OEM tank.  When you daily drive/cruise you only use the pump gas in the OEM tank and when you want power the port injection kicks in with the high octane fuel.  It’s a win/win, especially if you do not have ethanol close by and have to special order the exotic fuel like we do here in the PNW.  However this does mean you need a 2nd fuel tank for the port injection which can be a pain, BUT CorkSport has that covered in this complete kit

Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Ok let’s recap on where the CorkSport Port Injection Kit for Mazdaspeed 3 fits in:

  • 4 Extra Injectors aka 8th Port Fuel Injection Kit – one injector per runner for more precise fueling
  • Return Style Setup – Fuel pressure rising with boost pressure for more capacity and precision
  • Standalone Tank – Cheap pump gas for daily driving and high octane fuel for port injection power in the secondary fuel cell

I don’t know about you, but this sounds like you can have your cake and eat it to!

CORKSPORT MAZDA PERFORMANCE BLOG

Image Credit: Shift Sector Coalinga 2020

Let’s look at the components that make up the CorkSport Port Injection Fuel Kit.  What’s in the Box:

CorkSport Fender Mounted Fuel Cell

This is a huge element of what makes the CorkSport Port Injection Fuel Kit great.  This fuel cell is custom CAD designed specifically for your GEN1 and GEN2 Mazdaspeed 3 to fit hidden under the headlight behind the bumper cover.  At 2.6 gallons capacity you don’t need to refill the fuel cell often and there is an integrated level sensor to remind you when you are at 0.8 gallons.  No in-cab tanks and smells. 

Mazdaspeed 3 Fender Mounted Auxiliary Fuel Cell

Quantum Fuel Pump

  • A 380LPH inline fuel pump is used.  This is a Bosch 044 style pump that has the flow capacity needed and is e85 safe.
Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

DeatschWerks Fuel Filters

  • Two fuel filters are used in the system for complete filtration.  A pre-pump 100 micron filter filters the fuel flowing from the tank to the pump, therefore protection the pump from debris.  A post-pump 10 micron filter filters the fuel even more before entering the fuel injectors, therefore protecting the fuel injectors from very small particulates.  Both filters use a dual stage filtration design that incorporates a magnet and a stainless steel mesh media.
Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Spec’d Length 6AN Fuel Lines

  • No headaches and ready to go! Like our Mazdaspeed high pressure fuel line, the included fuel lines are the CorkSport Fuel Lines are spec’d to length and fully assembled ready to use.  The lines are PTFE lined with stainless steel braiding and a hytrel coating for a sleek finish and protection against abrasion.  All fittings minus on 150deg fitting are permanently crimped and sealed.
Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Fuel Pressure Regulator

  • An AEM fuel pressure regulator is used for this return style setup.  This provides easy adjustment and setup of the fuel rail pressure with the included Fuel Lab Analog Pressure Gauge
Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Electronics

  • Too further simplify, a 30amp relay kit is provided.  Relays are a critical component in setting up a port injection fuel system.  This allows you to safely and reliably provide power and control to the fuel pump. With that a Hobbs Switch is also provided, this acts as a trigger for the relay to apply power to the fuel pump when a set boost pressure is met.  Example: when you reach 4psi the Hobbs Switch will signal the relay to apply power to the fuel pump.  This is a great setup for daily driven cars because you only turn on the pump when needed vs running at all times.  It greatly helps the life of your pump.
Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Misc Hardware

  • Lastly is all the misc hardware and brackets to get this into your speed.  We’ve got this handled and clearly show the install process with the online color step-by-step instructions.
Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

Alright that’s what’s in the box for the CorkSport Port Injection Kit; now let’s talk about the other required items.  There are 2-3 critical items needed to get your port injection kit up and running.  

Port Injection Controller

  • The OEM ECU and Cobb/Versatuner tuning options cannot control the extra 4x injectors in the kit so you will need a separate controller and software for this.  There is a simple and proven option with the Split Second Additional Injector Controller AIC1.  It comes with a ready to run harness for EV6 injectors and the harness integration for power, signal and control are very simple.  Check it out here and add it to your CorkSport Port Injection Kit for a one stop shop.
Split Second Injector Controller AIC1-V4H EV6 for Auxiliary Fuel System

Injectors

  • You will need 4x injectors for the CorkSport 8th Port Fuel Kit.  The injectors need to have 14mm o-rings top and bottom and the length of 34mm or 48mm (if using the CorkSport intake manifold).  To use with the Split Second Additional Injector Controller AIC1; you will want the EV6 connection style. For capacity we recommend at least 1000cc/mm.  To cover all these requirements just use the Injector Dynamics ID1050x.  They are proven and reliable, you can grab a set right here with the CorkSport Port Injection Kit.
Injector Dynamics 1050x Port Injectors for Auxiliary Fuel System

Bonus!

  • While this is not required for operation, it is highly recommended.  The N2MB Racing WOT Box allows you to change the type of Redline and Launch Control cut to a safer method.  OEM will deactivate the injectors for this vs the WOT Box deactivates the spark plugs.  This is much safer for your engine, especially with running a port injection fuel kit.  With this you can also Flat Foot Shift which is faster and way too much fun. (Insert Fireball Emoji Here)

Why doesn’t the CorkSport Port Injection Fuel Kit include these items? 

That’s a good question and we have a good reason.  Originally the kit was going to, but we asked the community how they would want the kit and the answers surprised us.  A lot of people wanted the kit minus the Controller and the Injectors because they already had those items.  So we pulled those out of the kit as solo items you can choose to add if needed.   

Installing this kit into your Mazdaspeed 3 is a day project with some buddies.  Bank on 6+ hours due to the wiring (its always tedious, but important to do right). Read the installation instructions before starting the install so you are ready with all the needed tools and supplies for wiring. 

Mazdaspeed 3 8th Port Auxiliary Fuel Kit

I do want to note that like any project that involves wiring, there will be some wiring required for the install and the extra wiring and connection you decide you need are not included in the CorkSport kit.  Every car is different and how each person wants to get things wired up is different.  There is also some very minimal drilling required to install the tank mounting brackets. 

CORKSPORT MAZDA PERFORMANCE BLOG

I hope you found this blog helpful and informative not just to learn about the CorkSport Port Injection Fuel Kit, but to also learn about the other setups and options you can choose from.  I hope this helps you decide what is best for your car and goals.  Give us a call if you have any questions, we’d be happy to help. 

Barett @ CS

Speed 3 Auxiliary Fueling Tank

Mazdaspeed 3 Auxiliary Fuel Tank

Mazdaspeed 3 Auxiliary Fuel Tank
Auxiliary Fuel Tank

The time has come to reveal our Speed 3 Auxiliary Fuel Tank design!

Years ago there was an option to run Port Injection or Methanol Injection without the requirement of a smelly and messy tank in your cabin.  Sadly that option disappeared and left the community with a need for another purpose-built and designed option for high power Mazdaspeed 3s.

That’s right! There is soon to be another fender mounting fuel cell for the 2007-2013 Mazdaspeed 3 and it’s packed with more capacity, durability, and functionality.  

We approached this project with a clean slate and set a goal to maximize capacity, work with both GEN1 & GEN2 Mazdaspeed 3s, and provide the functionality needed for both methanol and E85 port injection auxiliary fueling.  

This was no easy task; we encountered many challenges that forced us to look to different methods and innovations to succeed.  However, through those challenges we developed a tank like no other available for the Mazdaspeed community.  

Mazdaspeed 3 Auxiliary Fuel Tank
Auxiliary Fuel Tank

The greatest challenge we faced was the manufacturing method.  We originally approached the design with the intent to use cut, formed and welded sheet metal as the material, but this quickly proved to create many unwanted issues.  Cost, design flexibility, capacity, durability are just a few of the issue we faced with sheet metal.  With that we looked to other processes…what about a gas can?  Those are plastic and have very irregular shapes…

From there we identified that rotomolding was the ideal path to pursue.  It helped us maximize capacity, incorporate the features needed, reduced cost, and increased durability/reliability of the tank. 

Speaking of durability first…

Mazdaspeed 3 Auxiliary Fuel Tank
Auxiliary Fuel Tank

Yup…we parked a truck on the tank and it took it like a champ.  As you can see there is a small amount of deformation, but that’s it!  After that we wacked the tank with a 3 pound sledge hammer on the front face (much like if you hit an object on the road) and again it took it like a champ!

Mazdaspeed 3 Auxiliary Fuel Tank
Auxiliary Fuel Tank

Upon closer inspection we did not find any cracks forming due to the truck test or the impacts of the sledge hammer.  After letting the tank sit for a bit we found that the tank actually formed back to its original shape before the testing.  

Mazdaspeed 3 Auxiliary Fuel Tank
Auxiliary Fuel Tank

So what makes the CorkSport Auxiliary Fuel Tank strong and durable?  Two things:

  1. The material used is Cross-Link HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) which is a very durable and resilient material by itself.  Add in the cross-link reinforcement in a 0.190” wall thickness and you now have a material that can handle a large amount of impact force and yielding (bending) without failing.  
  2. The manufacturing process is the other key aspect here.  Unlike welding, there are no seams or welded joints that can fail.  In the rotomolding process, the HDPE is poured into a mold that is heated to the plastic molten temperature.  This powder melts and creates one continuous structure with an average wall thickness of 0.190”.  Even the brass threaded inserts are embedded into the plastic with no seam or seal to leak.  
Mazdaspeed 3 Auxiliary Fuel Tank
Auxiliary Fuel Tank

Speaking of those threaded inserts, those are really neat.   When the mold is assembled, there brass threaded inserts are fixture inside the mold in set locations.  These give us the flexibility to have integrated mounting points for the brackets that mount to the vehicle AND for both methanol pumps and the standard 044 style fuel pump bracket.  

Now let’s look at a cutaway of the Computer Aided Drafting Model of the tank so we can see a couple other key design features.  BTW these would not have been possible (or atleast not cost effective) with sheet metal. 

Mazdaspeed 3 Auxiliary Fuel Tank
Auxiliary Fuel Tank

Probably the most critical and useful features of the fuel cell is the integrated sump for the pump feed.  This is the little area under the blue line.  This “low” zone is called the sump and the point is to create a lower spot for the pump to be fed fuel.  This reduces the chance of fuel starvation during braking and cornering as well as allows you to get the full capacity of the tank to your pump. 

Next you can see a “chamber” on the left side.  This actually sits under the frame rail a bit which allowed us to increase the capacity to ~2.6 gallons but it also serves another purpose.  If you are running a port injection auxiliary fuel kit then you most likely have a fuel return from the regulator; this is where that return line connects.   The low ceiling in this chamber helps reduce aeration of the fuel due to the return line flow.  This green line also sits just below the low level sensor so you’ll know when you are getting close to this threshold.  

Mazdaspeed 3 Auxiliary Fuel Tank
Auxiliary Fuel Tank

Alright let’s wrap this up.  Designed specifically for the 2007-2013 Mazdaspeed 3, you can utilize the tank for methanol or ethanol fuels and you can switch from either or if you change your setup.  Durable and chemical resistant material used can take beating and once installed the tank and black filler cap basically disappears from view.  

We are stoked to bring a new and innovative option to the Mazdapseed Community very soon.  

  • Barett @ CorkSport

P.S. – that stainless bracket in the last image is my splitter mounting system for my 2009 Mazdaspeed 3.  Check out @halfmilespeed3 for more details!